AP NEWS

Letters To The Editor 11/26/2018

November 26, 2018

YOUR OPINION

Take accountability

Editor: My friends from other countries ask me, “What is happening to the United States?”

Usually, this occurs after a mass shooting. My answer is usually generic. It is a slow process that started many decades ago, from dwindling family time to the lack of church; from drugs and alcohol taking over to the lack of respect for fellow people.

Other problems include lack of a positive future, immigration, a lack of harsh penalties, fraud, government corruption and people not being held accountable for their actions.

When I go by the neighborhood bar, I see the same people a lot of the time. These people seem to know all about what’s happening in their community, all the stories and all the dirt. They are efficient at degrading people and usually have a bad outlook on life. If they have a problem with a neighbor, they don’t talk it out to resolve the situation, Rather, they start a rumor; it’s easier.

I don’t know if they think this will keep the attention away from them; it usually doesn’t work. This is because everybody is subject to ridicule. Maybe the first thing they should do is get out of the bar. I was told a long time ago that people like that are not your buddies, they are your drinking buddies.

More people should take a step back, take a deep breath and look at themselves in the mirror. In order to change America, we need to look at ourselves and ask ourselves if we do the right thing. What example do we set for the people around us and our families?

RICHARD JACKSON

TUNKHANNOCK

Good will lacking

Editor: Racism abounds. Anti-Semitism is exalted. Divisiveness and anger are the common currency. Thoughtful discussion gives way to appeals to fear.

Gerrymandering secures unrepresentative congressional seats. Labels replace a civil interchange of ideas. A president attacks the Constitution’s First and 14th amendments that he is sworn to uphold and defend.

From the end of the World War II through at least the mid-1960s a sole worker could get a job that allowed him to raise a family, buy a home and send his children to college. Health care was affordable, pension plans assured that after putting in 35 years or so at work a person could afford to retire.

Programs that lifted America’s economic working people made the United States a model, including Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. Now they are looked upon by some as “socialism.”

Each day brings new tragedies and more corruption. A president who proclaims his innocence assured minimal repercussions by waiting until after the midterm elections before firing the man charged with assuring an impartial investigation of the president in favor of a partisan individual committed to stopping the investigation.

Another mass shooting occurred the same day a school board in Pennsylvania looked to arm teachers. A study by the New York Police Department showed that even with highly trained, full-time police, less than one bullet in five finds its intended target.

Yet we want to address the violence by putting firearms in the hands of people whose job is to teach.

America, it is time to come home, it is time to put away the anger, the fear and the vitriol. It is time to sit with your neighbors, with those with whom you disagree, with those who do not look like you and seek understanding of each other’s views.

PETER WOLMAN

SHAVERTOWN

 

Enforce base speeds

Editor: Pennsylvania highways, which are the backbone for work and commerce, are mostly constructed of only two lanes.

We all have witnessed things like mattresses tied to the roof of a vehicle and flashers on as the car goes very slowly. We may have seen a chair on the roof, or something similar.

It is time for legislation in Harrisburg to stop people from making a lane for their personal use, backing up other lanes and creating a possible accident or traffic hazard.

By enforcing a minimum highway speed we can eliminate these problems and have a more productive flow of traffic, utilizing both lanes efficiently.

ROBERT WILLS

CLARKS SUMMIT

 

No impeachment

Editor: I wish people would stop talking about impeaching President Trump.

I think we’re heading down a slippery slope when people don’t agree with our elected officials. It could weaken the office of president for generations.

I think Trump is trying to do a good job but he needs more time. If you don’t like what you see, vote him out in 2020. I don’t see anything wrong with a border wall to help secure our borders, where people can cross legally by obeying our laws.

JACK BRENNAN

SCRANTON

 

Pleased by election

Editor: I’m trilled to see Democrats and even third parties have more wins across the nation.

It is wonderful to see the House will be taken over by Democrats. After needing 23 seats to have a House majority, they got more than that. It seemed a long shot, especially as President Trump stumped across the country with rallies to support his choices.

Thank goodness voter turnout was the highest since the 1960s. More women were elected, along with some Muslims and gay people. It will be nice to see more diversity in public life.

A number of major races were super-close and needed recounts. Major wins for marijuana use were approved in several states and the voting rights of felons and drug users were reinstated in some states.

Thanks to all who participated and waited in lines to vote and express their choices and opinions .

VERA SCROGGINS

BRACKNEY,

SUSQUEHANNA COUNTY

 

Think critically

Editor: It’s so much easier to just read a headline or catch a blurb on the news and consider yourself informed than it is to research and think through an issue on your own.

Everyone is busy. We’ve all got things that are pressing and require time and effort. I contend that America is at a crossroads and it’s upon us to think critically through the heavy issues that face us as a nation. The media can be an excellent source of news and information, but it shouldn’t be a substitute for our own thought process.

More than ever we need to research all sides of issues, not merely the ones that make us comfortable. We need to be open to the possibility that our conclusions may not always be the same as when we started the process. That’s healthy and I believe necessary in today’s turbulent times.

DAVID SNYDER

OLD FORGE

 

What conflicts?

Editor: It’s not the stupid economy, it’s the emoluments.

BOB SINGER

WILKES-BARRE

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