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AM Prep-Cyber Corner

October 4, 2018

IN THE NEWS: NATIONWIDE EMERGENCY ALERT TEST

WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it the text heard ‘round the world — or at least around the nation. At precisely 2:18 p.m. yesterday, electronic devices sounded off across the U.S. as the Federal Emergency Management agency conducted an emergency alert test. As the tone sounded, messages on peoples’ screens read: “Presidential Alert” — with the information: “THIS IS A TEST of the National Wireless Emergency Alert System. No action is needed.” It was the first test of the national wireless emergency system by FEMA. Some people got the alert more than once — and others didn’t get it at all. FEMA estimates about 225 million devices — or about 75 percent of all mobile phones in the country — would have received the alert. It hasn’t said yet whether the test went well.

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Sound:

031673-v-341:28-(Julie Walker, AP correspondent)-“Julie Walker, New York”-The Latest: Judge refuses to block emergency alert test (3 Oct 2018)

<<CUT *031673 (10/03/18)££ 341:28 “Julie Walker, New York”

031688-a-124:08-(Michael Aleman, college student, Florida International University, in AP interview)-“for little things”-Wireless alert sounds across the US at 2:18 EDT (3 Oct 2018)

<<CUT *031688 (10/03/18)££ 124:08 “for little things”

031689-a-110:88-(Morgan Fatowe, college student, Florida International University, in AP interview)-“relationship with everyone”-Wireless alert sounds across the US at 2:18 EDT (3 Oct 2018)

<<CUT *031689 (10/03/18)££ 110:88 “relationship with everyone”

IN THE NEWS: RUSSIA AND CYBERATTACKS

LONDON (AP) — British and Australian officials say nations around the world have been the target of cyberattacks. And, the officials say, the Russian military intelligence unit GRU is behind those attacks. British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt says the GRU has been involved in “indiscriminate and reckless” attacks against political institutions, businesses, media and sports. Among the targets of the electronic intrusions, say the Brits, are the World Anti-Doping agency, Ukrainian transport systems — and the 2016 U.S. presidential race. Russia denies any involvement.

ON THE WEB: NHL PLAYERS AND FORTNITE

CYBERSPACE (AP) — The NHL season is now under way and the long pursuit for the Stanley Cup has begun. But can the grind of playing a long, grueling season be compatible with playing video games? Some players say they don’t think so. Vancouver forward Bo Horvat has gone on record as saying his team, the Canucks, has instituted a Fortnite ban for the season. But that has triggered a discussion about whether playing games on consoles can affect how players perform on the ice. One of Horvat’s teammates says playing Fortnite hasn’t been an issue for the team.

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Online:

NHL site: http://www.nhl.com

by Oscar Wells Gabriel II

Follow Oscar Wells Gabriel II on Twitter at https://twitter.com/OWGabriel2

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