AP NEWS

A community of love and support

November 8, 2018

La PORTE — Worthy Women Recovery Home hosted their 10th annual banquet and auction on Saturday. Charitable members of the community gathered to enjoy a meal together and raise money for the home.

Worthy Women Recovery Home provides women who are transitioning from incarceration or are particularly at-risk for incarceration a home, along with programs that help them become positive role models for the community.

The banquet was held at the Heston Hills Banquet Center in La Porte and featured remarks from the program’s founder, Sonshine Troche.

Troche gave some insight about how the program impacts the community.

“Too many of the ladies in the La Porte County Jail are trapped in the recidivism (re-arrest) cycle,” Troche said. “They are sent to prison and then released broken, desperate and depressed. They have nowhere to go but back to the same environment that contributed to their incarceration. Many women return to jail, sometimes a week after release. They need healing, to learn structure and to learn recovery and redemption.”

The recovery home tends to host numerous women struggling with addiction at any given time. Housemate Emily Finchum explained how living in the recovery home has provided her real world coping skills.

“I came straight to Worthy Women Recovery Home out of prison, and although I did learn a lot through prison programs, they don’t teach you how to apply that to the real world,” Finchum said. “Coming to the home really helps you learn to use what you’ve learned in a real life situation, so that it becomes a habit.”

The home aims to make its residents feel as cared for as possible. The program provides an environment for those in recovery to make relationships with other housemates and community members.

Worthy Woman Allison Hofferth expressed how the home has eased her transition by giving her new camaraderie with women in her situation.

“We’re all a family,” Hofferth said. “There’s a lot of love and support throughout the community, especially in the house, but from all over. In the program, we can get help with anything we need. We get the support we need physically and emotionally.”

The banquet’s key note speaker, Amy Brinkley is living proof that success can come after addiction. Brinkley is the State Bureau Chief of Indiana Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA). She is also a published author, and shared some glimpses of her autobiographical novel “A Glimpse of Bind Faith.”

“Turning my back on all the past and the pain of my mistakes wouldn’t make them disappear, just like pretending I’m perfect will not bring the healing I so desperately needed,” Brinkley said. “I have learned that no matter what I am faced with — whether it be death, divorce, or prison — I still deserve to be free of guilt, shame and fear and most importantly that I deserve to be free from addiction.”

Her harrowing tale, along with the Worthy Women’s testimonials inspired donations. A raffle and a live auction were held after all of the speeches were finished.

Worthy Women Recovery Home relies on these donations to operate. They receive no federal funding. Those interested in contributing are encouraged to visit www.worthywomen.org.

AP RADIO
Update hourly