TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — The Latest on the aftermath of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida that left 17 people dead (all times local):

7:05 a.m.

A 15-year-old who was grievously wounded in the Florida school shooting has filed notice that he will sue the authorities to seek money to cover the cost of his recovery.

A lawyer for Anthony Borges and his family says the sheriff's office, the school resource officer, the Broward County school system and the principal at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School failed to protect students from a teen-aged gunman who killed 17 people and wounded more than a dozen others on Valentine's Day. Investigators say former student Nikolas Cruz confessed to the shootings following his arrest.

Attorney Alex Arreaza writes that Borges was hit five times, still can't walk and has "a great deal of difficulty performing rudimentary tasks for himself."

The families of the 17 Florida high school massacre victims called on the state legislature to pass a bill they believe would improve security at the state’s public schools. (March 5)


6:30 a.m.

Prosecutors are expected to begin presenting a grand jury with evidence against a 19-year-old accused of killing 17 people at a Florida high school.

The Sun Sentinel reports that the panel, which meets behind closed doors, is expected to begin considering formal charges against Nikolas Cruz on Tuesday. He's been jailed since the Feb. 14 massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where he was once a student.

Cruz confessed to investigators when he was captured about an hour after the shooting. Multiple witnesses have identified him as the shooter.

The Broward State Attorney's Office typically presents evidence to grand jurors in all first-degree murder cases and all police shootings. The panel will hear testimony from witnesses and then vote on an indictment. It could take more than one day.



The Florida Senate has passed a school safety bill that would place new restrictions on rifle sales, allow some teachers to carry guns in schools and create new school mental health programs.

The Senate voted 20-18 Monday for the bill that's a response to the Feb. 14 school shootings in Parkland that left 17 people dead.

Few, if any, senators were completely happy with the legislation. Many Republicans don't like the idea of raising the minimum age to buy rifles from 18 to 21 or creating a waiting period to purchase the weapons.

Many Democrats think the bill didn't go far enough because it doesn't include a ban on assault-style rifles or large-capacity magazines.

Florida's House has not yet taken up its version of the bill.