BROOKLINE, Mass. (AP) _ Some were old and gray. Others looked e ready to play. They were Davis Cup veterans who stood where it all began to celebrate a century of international tennis.

``I'm very grateful they remembered the people who played in the Davis Cup years ago,'' said Jack Kramer, who played for the United States in 1939 and 1946-47. ``It sure was a marvelous group.''

From 87-year-old Sidney Wood, who played for the United States in 1931 and '34, to MaliVai Washington, who last played in 1997, the players lined up behind the cup itself and U.S. and Australian flags. The two countries finished their Davis Cup quarterfinal with singles matches Sunday afternoon.

Other Americans in the ceremony included Tat Bartzen, Robert Seguso, Tom Gorman, Aaron Krickstein, Gardner Mulloy, Robert Perry, Ham Richardson and Tony Trabert. Australians Ken McGregor, Fred Stolle and Frank Sedgman also took part.

Some, like 84-year-old grand slam winner Don Budge, skipped the ceremony because of the 100-plus degree heat.

The Davis Cup was founded in 1900 when recent Harvard graduate Dwight Davis commissioned a trophy for $750 and challenged England to a three-day tie at the Longwood Cricket Club.

``It's just like it was back in 1938,'' said the 78-year-old Kramer, who won three national doubles titles here.

A common theme this week is the drop in stature of the Davis Cup as it competes with individual tournaments offering big prize money. This year, the two top American singles players _ Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi _ both balked initially before Sampras changed his mind and decided to play doubles.

``I'd like to see them get 100 percent participation,'' Kramer said. ``I think the Cup deserves that.''