IRONTON, Ohio (AP) _ The bride wore white, strains of the ``Wedding March'' were in the air, and there was a minister and several guests. But the location of a young couple's weekend nuptials was not so traditional.

Aaron Grenier and Michelle Hogsten, both 24, exchanged their vows Saturday at a nursing home in this southern Ohio community.

The setting allowed Grenier's mother to be on hand for the big day. Following a series of strokes and other ailments, Beverly Cade, 48, was placed in the Jo-Lin Health Center in February, and doctors have advised her not to leave. She was seated down front for the ceremony.

``We just wanted her to be able to be there,'' Grenier said. ``That was what was important.'' He and his new bride said they'd been planning their unusual wedding for six months.

It was the first ever held in the home's activity room, said Peggy Dyer, Jo-Lin activities director. Other residents were eager to be wheeled in so they could attend.

``It has been a long time since many of them had ever seen a wedding,'' Dyer said.

The wedding also was a novelty for the minister. Rev. Richard Carter said he'd married inmates at the county jail before but had never had a couple tie the knot in a nursing home.

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Information from: The Ironton Tribune, http://www.irontontribune.com/