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The Latest: More remains found at Texas plane crash site

February 26, 2019
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Local and federal officials gather at a staging area during the investigation of a plane crash in Trinity Bay in Anahuac, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019. A Boeing 767 cargo jetliner heading to Houston with a few people aboard disintegrated after crashing Saturday into the bay east of the city, according to a Texas sheriff. (Brett Coomer/Houston Chronicle via AP)

ANAHUAC, Texas (AP) — The Latest on the crash of a Boeing 767 jet freighter into Trinity Bay in Texas(all times local):

3:45 p.m.

Texas authorities have found part of a human body at the site where a Boeing 767 cargo plane crashed, although it’s unclear whether it belongs to the missing crew member.

A Texas Sheriff says a search dog found “part of human remains” amid the debris field left when Flight 3591 slammed into Trinity Bay near Houston Saturday.

“It’s not a body,” said Chambers County Sheriff Brian Hawthorne, adding that DNA testing was needed to identify the remains.

Authorities have recovered the bodies of two of the three people who were aboard the Houston-bound flight. They are preparing to dredge part of the muddy bay in search of the third person and the plane’s black box.

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10:45 a.m.

Authorities have been searching a bay off southeast Texas for clues about what caused a cargo plane carrying Amazon packages to nose-dive into the shallow water.

All three men on board were killed Saturday when the Houston-bound Boeing 767 crashed in Trinity Bay, about 35 miles (55 kilometers) east of the city.

Two bodies were recovered over the weekend, but crews were still looking for the third on Tuesday.

The plane was being operated by Atlas Air for Amazon when it crashed and disintegrated on impact.

Crews are using air boats to scour the shallow waters of a southeast Texas bay for clues about what led to the sudden crash of a Boeing 767 cargo plane, and for the body of one of the three people aboard. (Feb. 26)
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Crews have been using airboats and helicopters to circle the crash scene, where white chunks of fuselage could be seen above long grass. A north wind has also helped searchers by exposing more of the large debris field.