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The Latest: Even in defeat, Moore issues plea for donations

December 21, 2017

FILE - In this Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017 photo, U.S. Sen.-elect Doug Jones speaks during a news conference in Birmingham, Ala. Alabama is sorting through write-in votes in last week's U.S. Senate election, though Secretary of State John Merrill says the outcome isn't expected to change. Merrill announced Monday, Dec. 18, 2017, that counties will check write-in votes under a new state law that only requires poll workers to sort through them if the number of write-ins is higher than the winner's margin of victory. There were 22,814 write-ins. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The Latest on Alabama’s Senate race (all times local):

2 p.m.

Defeated U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore has issued a new plea for donations to chase down what he says are reports of fraud and irregularities in the voting.

In an email to supporters Thursday afternoon, Moore’s campaign asked supporters to “dig deep” and donate anywhere from $25 to $1,000 to his “Election Integrity Fund.”

The fundraising email was sent after Alabama’s secretary of state announced that “the most controversial” issue of potential voter fraud had been resolved after his staff found no evidence of anything improper.

Democrat Doug Jones defeated Moore on Dec. 12 to become the first Democrat elected to the Senate from Alabama in a quarter-century.

Moore was beset by accusations of sexual misconduct involving teenage girls. He has denied the allegations.

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11:15 a.m.

Alabama election officials say they’ve found nothing improper after investigating a TV interview that raised suspicions of voter fraud in the state’s closely watched Senate election.

Democrat Doug Jones defeated Republican Roy Moore on Dec. 12 to become the first Democrat elected to the Senate from Alabama in a quarter-century. Moore was beset by accusations of sexual misconduct involving teenage girls.

During the live broadcast, a man supporting Jones said he and others had come from different parts of the country and “pitched in to vote and canvass together.”

The comment fueled speculation that out-of-state voters were taking part in Alabama’s election.

Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill said Thursday that his office determined the man has lived in Alabama for more than a year and is a registered voter in the state.

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