Undated (AP) _ Cheers went up in 10 school districts Monday at the announcement of the 10 teachers who had made one more cut in the competition to take a trip on board the space shuttle.

''We're on cloud nine,'' said Charles Foley, principal at Concord High in New Hampshire, where finalist Sharon Christa McAuliffe teaches economics, history and law.

''Everybody who know her thought she had a real good shot,'' said her husband, Steven McAuliffe. ''I'm thrilled.''

''She's the kind of person who could come back and relate it meaningfully to her students,'' Foley said.

Ms. McAuliffe, 36, and nine other people, including two from Idaho, were chosen from among 114 semifinalists. More than 10,000 teachers originally applied to become an astronaut. One teacher and an alternate will be selected in August to make the flight scheduled for Jan. 22.

Richard A. Methia, 40, an English teacher at New Bedford High School in Massachusetts, was among the 10 finalists.

''Fantastic,'' said science teacher Mike Kobza. ''That is great. I'm very, very happy for him. I certainly hope he is on of the two finalists. He's a credit to the school.''

Idaho got two teachers onto the finalists' list - David Marquart, 43, a high school business and computer science teacher from Boise and Barbara R. Morgan, 33, of McCall, a resort community of 2,188 people.

''I was very optimistic,'' said Everett Howard, superintendent of the McCall-Donnelly School District, where Ms. Morgan is a second-grade teacher. ''She is quite an outstanding young lady. She is very strong academically and is a very personable individual.''

''We are all very excited around here today,'' said Helen Williams, who headed the state Department of Education selection committee. ''It's kind of exciting to think that our two candidates have done so well.''

''Isn't it fantastic? We are just overwhelmed. We think it's terrific she's been selected,'' said Ken M. Gahs, principal at Kenwood High School in Baltimore County, Md., where finalist Kathleen Anne Beres teaches.

''Those of us in the office let out a cheer when we heard,'' Gahs said.

Ms. Beres, 36, from Rosedale, Md., spends ''her summers climbing mountains and sailing across the ocean and walking glaciers in Greenland,'' her principal said.

''She's a good representative of the teaching profession. She's articulate, she's an exciting teacher and I'm sure NASA made a wonderful choice.'' said David Zahren, teacher at the G. Gardner Shugart Middle School in Prince George's County, the Maryland semifinalist who was not selected.

''I think its really good,'' said Jeanine Kromm, 16, who was a student in Miss Beres' field biology class. ''She has the experience and the drive to do it.''