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Chronology of news events in 2013

December 23, 2013

JULY

July 1

— Egypt’s military issues a “last chance” ultimatum to President Mohammed Morsi, giving him 48 hours to meet the demands of millions of protesters in the streets seeking the ouster of the Islamic leader or the generals will intervene and impose their own plan for the country.

July 2

— Insurgents unleash a new wave of attacks in Iraq killing at least 49 people, the latest in a surge of violence across the country that has raised concerns over a return to sectarian bloodshed.

July 3

— Egypt’s first democratically elected president is overthrown by the military, ousted after just one year by the same kind of Arab Spring uprising that brought the Islamist leader to power.

July 4

— Bolivian President Evo Morales says that the rerouting of his plane over suspicions that National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden was on board is a plot by the U.S. to intimidate him and other Latin American leaders.

July 5

— Pope Francis clears two of the 20th Century’s most influential popes to become saints in the Roman Catholic church, approving a miracle needed to canonize Pope John Paul II and waiving Vatican rules to honor Pope John XXIII.

July 6

— A runaway train carrying crude oil derails in eastern Quebec, igniting fires and explosions that destroy a town’s busy downtown district, kill 15 and leave dozens missing.

July 7

— More than 50 supporters of Egypt’s ousted president are killed by security forces in one of the deadliest single episodes of violence in more than 2 1/2 years of turmoil.

July 8

—U.S. officials investigating a jetliner crash in San Francisco determine that Flight 114 from Seoul was traveling ’significantly below” its target speed as it approached the airport and the crew tried to abort the landing just before it smashed onto the runway killing two and injuring more than 180 people.

July 9

— Egypt’s interim president names an economist as prime minister and wins $8 billion in promises of aid from wealth allies in the Gulf in moves aimed at stabilizing a political transition less than a week after the army deposed Islamist President Mohammed Morsi.

July 10

— The head of a U.S. railway company whose runaway oil train crashed into a Quebec town blames the engineer for failing to set brakes properly. The train hurtled down a seven-mile (ll-kilometer) incline and ignited a fire that left at least 15 dead and dozens missing. It is Canada’s worst rail disaster in 150 years.

July 11

— Tens of thousands of workers across Brazil walk off their jobs in a mostly peaceful nationwide strike, demanding better working conditions and improved public services in Latin America’s largest nation.

July 12

— A train carrying hundreds of passengers derails and crashes outside Paris on one of the busiest days for vacation getaways. At least six die and dozens are injured.

July 13

— Gunmen ambush a United Nations peacekeeping team in Sudan’s western Darfur region, killing 7 and wounding 17 in the deadliest ever single attack against the force in the country.

July 14

— Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says the international community and the United States have “no sense of urgency” when it comes to Iran’s nuclear ambitions, suggesting that the various conflicts in the Middle East have diverted the West’s attention.

July 15

— The most senior U.S. official to visit Egypt since the ouster of its elected president says Washington is committed to helping the Arab country succeed in its “second chance” at democracy, adding this can only happen with the participation of the Muslim Brotherhood.

July 16

— Mexican forces capture the country’s most brutal Zetas drug cartel leader Miguelo Angel Trevino Morales, better known as Z-40, boosting the crime fighting bona fides of Mexico’s new president.

July 17

— At least 22 children die and more than a dozen others are sick in the eastern Indian state of Bihar after eating food that was tainted with insecticide spotlighting shortcomings in a government school lunch program intended to feed millions of malnourished students.

July 18

— Alex Navalny, a charismatic and creative Russian leader who exposed high-level corruption and mocked the Kremlin, is sentenced to five years in prison for embezzlement in a verdict that set off street protests and drew condemnation from the West.

July 19

— Secretary of State John Kerry seals a step toward relaunching the long-halted Middle East peace process, announcing that Israel and the Palestinians had agreed to a basis to return to negotiations.

July 20

— Five employees of the Italian cruise company are convicted of manslaughter in the Costa Concordia shipwreck that killed 32 people, receiving sentences of less than three years that lawyers for the victims and survivors criticize as too lenient.

July 21

— Belgium’s King Albert abdicates after a 20-year reign and his son Philippe takes over as the fractured nation’s seventh king, calling the division between the country’s 6 million Dutch-speaking Flemings and 4.5 million francophones one of its strengths.

July 22

— The Duchess of Cambridge, the former Kate Middleton, gives birth to a son who becomes third in line to the British throne after Prince Charles and Prince William.

July 23

— Al Qaida’s branch in Iraq claims responsibility for audacious raids on two high security prisons on the outskirts of Baghdad that killed dozens and set free hundreds of inmates, including some of its followers.

July 24

— Pope Francis makes an emotional plea for Roman Catholics to shun materialism in the first public Mass of his initial overseas trip as pontiff, traveling to Brazil, home to the world’s largest Catholic population.

July 25

— Angry anti-government demonstrations break out across Tunisia after gunmen kill the leader of the leftist opposition party, raising fears of new chaos on the difficult road to democracy in the cradle of the Arab Spring.

July 26

— Spanish police say they have arrested the driver of the train that sped through a curve and toppled over, killing 78 people, and plan to question him over suspected reckless driving.

July 27

— Security forces and armed men clash with supporters of Egypt’s ousted president, killing at least 65 people in mayhem that underscores an increasingly heavy hand against protests demanding Mohammed Morsi’s return to power.

July 28

— Pope Francis’ historic trip to his home continent ends after a marathon weeklong visit that drew millions of people onto the sands of Rio’s famed Copacabana beach and appeared to reinvigorate the clergy and faithful alike in the world’s largest Roman Catholic country.

July 29

— U.S. launches a fresh bid to pull Israel and the Palestinians into substantial negotiations with a cast of characters that has presided over numerous failed Middle East peace efforts with former US envoy Martin Indyk shepherding a process that all sides expect to be protracted and difficult.

July 30

— U.S. Army Pfc Bradley Manning is acquitted of aiding the enemy — the most serious charge he faced — but is convicted of espionage, theft and nearly every other count for giving secrets to WikiLeaks, a verdict that could see him spend the rest of his life in prison.

July 31

— Syria’s embattled President Bashar Assad turns to the popular photo-sharing service Instagram in the latest attempt at improving his image as his country burns, posting pictures of himself and his glamorous wife surrounded by idolizing crowds. He already has a Facebook page, twitter account and YouTube channel.

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