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Today in Arizona History

April 4, 2018

PHOENIX (AP) — Sunday, April 8

On this date in 1893, the governor of Arizona Territory commuted the sentences of two editors of Arizona newspapers, convicted of criminal libel, from five days at the Yuma state penitentiary to five days in the Pima County Jail.

On this date in 1910, farmers and stockmen of the Prescott area complained of packs of wild dogs killing livestock. The dogs were said to be descendants of domestic dogs which had run away to live in the mountains around Prescott with the wolves, and were very large and vicious.

On this date in 1914, four troopers of the U.S. 9th Cavalry were wounded on American soil by wild bullets as Sonora state troops and Mexican Federals fought for possession of Naco.

On this date in 1920, the Arizona Livestock Commission warned that stockmen faced a possible loss of more than $1 million unless the disease of blackleg could be brought under control promptly.

Monday, April 9

On this date in 1910, Frank Aley, a mineralogist, humorist and writer, known by the pen name of “Mescal,” died at Calumet Hospital in Douglas. He had apparently been fatally injured in a fall from a horse.

On this day in 1920, several people were injured and a number of buildings were damaged or destroyed when the powder magazine at the United Verde Mine at Jerome exploded.

On this day in 1926, a tornado ripped through a 20-foot (6-meter) strip of east Phoenix, leveling six homes.

On this day in 1943, Sharlot Hall, a Prescott historian knows as Arizona’s poet-laureate, died.

Tuesday, April 10

On this date in 1845, Gen. George J. Roskruge, who served four terms as Pima County surveyor, three terms as city tngineer of Tucson and was unanimously elected the first president of the Association of Civil Engineers of Arizona, was born.

On this date in 1903, Mason Greenlee, pioneer from Kentucky for whom Greenlee County is named, died.

On this date in 1904, Sister Euphrasia, one of five sisters who came to Tucson in 1871 from St. Louis to establish the academy of St. Joseph, died.

On this date in 1907, the Western Federation of Miners attempted to organize and strike the mines at Bisbee without success.

Wednesday, April 11

On this date in 1903, A.H. Reynolds visited Benson to look into establishing experimental tobacco farms in the San Pedro Valley.

On this date in 1910, it was announced that Phoenix contractor R. Toohey had been given the contract for construction of the Globe-Roosevelt Highway.

On this date in 1919, Dr. Merrill P. Freeman, pioneer Tucson banker, Board of Regents member and Arizona historian, died.

On this date in 1938, Dr. Andrew E. Douglass, noted developer of the tree-ring dating technique, retired as director of the Steward Observatory.

Thursday, April 12

On this date in 1886, Gen. Nelson A. Miles arrived at Bowie Station to open a new campaign against the Apaches.

On this date in 1889, Flagstaff residents burned in effigy Gov. Lewis Wolfley to protest his veto of a bill to create Coconino County.

On this date in 1902, the Village of Yuma was incorporated as a town. It became a city in 1914.

On this date in 1910, A.W. Stewart, a Prescott electrician, built a new airship embodying the principals of the Wright Brothers machine, but with many new improvements of his own.

Friday, April 13

On this date in 1820, Thomas Gardner, one of the earliest pioneers in Santa Cruz County, was born.

On this date in 1877, the first Desert Land entry was made by William A. Hancock at Florence.

On this date in 1892, Charles D. Poston filed a claim on land which he called “Hole-in-the-Rock.” The land was set aside as the Papago Saguaro National Monument in 1914 and in 1930, became Papago Park.

On this date in 1905, the Arizona Dam on the Salt River was washed out.

On this date in 1917, the town of Florence turned on its first electric street lights.

Saturday, April 14

On this date in 1919, 2nd Lt. Frank Luke Jr. of Phoenix was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for gallantry in action beyond the call of duty.

On this date in 1920, delegates to the district meeting of the State Women’s Clubs in Phoenix exchanged heated words over the required medical examinations of students in public schools. Some called the requirements “un-American.”

On this date in 1927, the first passenger train of the Southern Pacific of Mexico Railroad left Nogales for Guadalajara.

On this date in 1928, Mexican and American firefighters in Nogales joined efforts to save the famous Nogales Brewery, but the building was completely destroyed by the fire.

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