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BC-GA--Georgia Weekend Items, ADVISORY, GA

May 3, 2019

Editors:

Here’s a list of Georgia stories expected to move so far for his weekend - May 4-5, 2019.

Moving Saturday

GEORGIA TOLL LANES

ATLANTA _ State transportation officials are planning a series of public meetings as it prepares for new toll lanes on the perimeter that encircles Atlanta. The Georgia Department of Transportation plans seven public meetings to provide information on the proposed lanes on the “top end” of Interstate 285. They’re planned from the stretch from Paces Ferry Road in Cobb County to Henderson Road in DeKalb County.

Information from The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Moving Sunday

BURN CENTER-AUGUSTA

AUGUSTA, Ga. _ A major burn center in Georgia will soon get even larger. Doctors Hospital in Augusta is embarking on a $75 million expansion of the Joseph M. Still Burn Center. Hospital officials say it will double the number of patient rooms as well as build a six-level, 550-space parking deck. The Augusta Chronicle reports that the project is the largest investment at the hospital since it was built in 1973.

Information from The Augusta Chronicle.

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Moving Saturday

GA--EXCHANGE-HANDYMAN DOLLMAKER

MACON, Ga. _Before toymakers realized there was a market for black baby dolls, a black handyman in Macon was making them by hand. When he was not working on houses for white families in Macon during the late 1800s and early 1900s, Leo Moss was painting the faces of his friends and family on papier-mâché heads, coloring their skin with chimney soot or boot dye. Today, the dolls are rarities worth thousands of dollars. Moss never saw a penny of it. He died poor and it is said he is buried in a pauper’s grave in Illinois.

By Laura Corley. The Telegraph.

Moving Sunday

GA--EXCHANGE-GEORGIA GOVERNOR’S MANSION

ATLANTA _ There’s a new family at the Governor’s Mansion and they’re trying to make it feel like home. But as Brian Kemp’s staff makes some changes to the 18-acre estate on West Paces Ferry, it has made some preservationists uneasy.

By Bo Emerson. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.