MIAMI (AP) _ O.J. Simpson said it's all a big misunderstanding.

Simpson called 911 Sunday night, saying he was trying to get help for a woman he said had been on a two-day cocaine binge with a former baseball player.

The 52-year-old Simpson placed the call from the townhouse of his 26-year-old girlfriend, Christie Prody, in southwest Miami-Dade County. A police report said Simpson told officers who showed up at the house that he was trying to get help for Prody.

A day later, the couple denied she was on the drug binge Simpson described to police. Simpson told The Associated Press on Tuesday that he was trying to get help for one of Prody's friends, whom he identified as ``Pinky.''

Simpson said Prody had called him in Los Angeles, crying and reporting that her friend was missing.

Prody told Simpson that the woman had last been seen with former Los Angeles Dodger Pedro Guerrero whom Simpson named in the emergency call he made from Prody's townhouse.

Simpson said he called Guerrero who told him the woman had left his home by cab the night before and he didn't know where she was. Simpson said he then decided to fly to Miami and help out.

When he arrived in Miami on Sunday, Simpson said, the woman was at Prody's apartment and she and some friends were doing ``an intervention'' aimed at getting her to a drug rehab, but the woman was resisting.

``She was spaced out,'' Simpson said. ``Next thing I know she's in her car. I told them to call the police and get someone here before she goes driving. ... She was a danger to herself and she would have been a danger to others.''

When no one did anything, he said he called 911, not telling them who he was, and asked for help. By the time two police officers arrived, he said the woman had left. He said the officers recognized him, took pictures with him and got autographs. But he said there was never any mention of his girlfriend being in distress or on drugs.

``Then I go to the airport to leave and, lo and behold, here comes a TV camera,'' he said. ``I went down there to support my friends who were concerned about a missing person and this is what happens.''

In his 911 call, Simpson told the emergency operator: ``We have a problem here. I'm trying to get a girl to go to rehab. ... She's been doing drugs for two days with Pedro Guerrero, who just got arrested for cocaine, and I'm trying to get her to leave her house and go into rehab right now.''

Guerrero was charged with cocaine conspiracy in Miami federal court Oct. 1. Drug Enforcement Administration agents accused him of agreeing to put up the money for a nephew to buy 15 kilograms of cocaine. He posted $100,000 bond.

To the 911 operator, Simpson added: ``This girl has spent the last two days doing drugs with him. Me and a friend just came over and said, `You're going into a rehab.' She got mad, she just got her car and now she's loaded out of her mind in her Mustang driving around town. She needs to be stopped.''

Phone messages seeking comment from Prody and Guerrero were not immediately returned Tuesday.

Prody recently moved from Brentwood, Simpson's old neighborhood in Los Angeles, to a townhouse in southwest Miami-Dade County. Simpson gave police Prody's new address as his own.

Two police officers went to Prody's townhouse after the 911 call and found Simpson, who told them that he and Prody were having a ``verbal dispute,'' the officers' report said.

They searched the area for Prody's car but did not find it. The officers gave Simpson a brochure on domestic violence. Police spokesman Ed Munn said state law requires officers to distribute the brochures during any domestic-related incident.

Police returned Monday morning and Prody answered the door. Munn said the officers returned to check on Prody's well-being and no police report was filed. Prody showed no signs of injury or impairment, Munn said Tuesday.

Miami-Dade police said they stood by the officer's report and that the case is closed. They said there was no sign of criminal activity and nothing more to pursue.

``Nothing is being investigated,'' police Detective Rudy Espinosa said. ``It was written as an informational report and nothing else. There's nothing else to follow up.''

In 1995, Simpson was acquitted of murdering his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman. However, the Hall of Fame running back later was found liable for their deaths in a civil trial and was ordered to pay $33.5 million in damages.

Simpson has said he is looking to move from California to South Florida and has been seen often in the Miami area in recent months.