Maine news from The Associated Press for Wednesday, June 13, 2018.

Here's a look at how AP's general news coverage is shaping up today in Maine. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome, and should be directed to the northern New England desk at 207-772-4157.

A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking news and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories, digests and digest advisories will keep you up to date.

UPCOMING TOMORROW:

RANKED CHOICE VOTING

Drivers begin the laborious process of traveling to more than 500 communities across Maine to retrieve ballots for additional ranked-choice tabulations. UPCOMING: 400 words by 2 p.m.

TOP STORIES:

RANKED CHOICE VOTING

PORTLAND, Maine — The nation's biggest test of ranked-choice voting resulted in confused voters, scores of spoiled ballots and fears of impending lawsuits. But there was no widespread chaos, and proponents were already talking up expanding the system Wednesday, even before the votes were fully tallied. By Patrick Whittle and Marina Villeneuve. SENT: 735 words, photos.

MAINE PRIMARY-CONGRESS

BANGOR, Maine — A state lawmaker who served in the U.S. Marine Corps had the most first-place votes in a Democratic congressional primary Tuesday, but it'll take additional tabulations to determine if he earned the right to challenge two-term Republican incumbent Rep. Bruce Poliquin. Jared Golden, of Lewiston, had collected about 50 percent of the vote with about two-thirds of the votes counted early Wednesday. If there's no majority, then the ballots will be shipped to the state capital for additional tabulations next week under ranked-choice voting. SENT: 340 words.

Also:

BC-Primary Rdp.

SMALLBIZ-SMALL TALK-FOOD TRUCKS

NEW YORK — Starting a food truck to sell tacos or barbecue on downtown streets may seem easy or fun, but owners are finding they need more sophisticated plans now that the novelty has worn off. A culinary fad a decade ago, food trucks have lost some luster and even new ones may not draw a crowd. Many prospective restaurateurs now use trucks as low-cost test kitchens and as literal marketing vehicles. And food truck operators soon realize they need to think strategically — especially about the winter. By Joyce M. Rosenberg. SENT: 1,000 words.

IN BRIEF:

MAPLE SEASON: Vermont's longer-than-average maple season helped make it the nation's largest producer of maple syrup, yielding 1.9 million gallons of the sweet stuff this year.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMISSIONER: The head of Maine's economic development office plans to step down next week.

BANK ROBBER: Officials say a man who said he had a gun robbed a Maine bank.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE-ICE CREAM PARLOR: A high school student in Maine is now the proud owner of an ice cream parlor that he purchased a month before his graduation.

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