SURFING-OFFICIAL SPORT

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Surf's up in California, where it's now the official state sport.

Gov. Jerry Brown announced Monday that he has signed a bill making it so.

The new law declares surfing to be "an iconic California sport" — though it acknowledges that surfing originated with the Polynesian people and was imported into California from Hawaii.

Still, it says Californians have embraced surfing and made important contributions to the modern sport.

The state's 1,100 miles of coastline are home to a number of world-famous surf breaks, and California hosts the Surfers' Hall of Fame, the International Surfing Museum, and the California Surf Museum. It's also the site of the International Surf Festival, the U.S. Open of Surfing, the Mavericks Big Wave Surf Contest and the Founders' Cup of Surfing.

BANK ROBBERY-BICYCLE ESCAPE

OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP) — A tangled web has netted a Kansas man three years behind bars.

The Kansas City Star reports that Richard Armenta, of Overland Park, Kansas, was sentenced Monday for robbing a Capital Federal Savings Bank branch on November 2017. He pleaded guilty in June.

Prosecutors say Richard Armenta, who is 57, fled on a bicycle after robbing a bank last year and got away with cash. Witnesses to the robbery told investigators the suspect was riding a blue bicycle and had a spider web tattoo on his hand.

About a week after the robbery, police responded to a disturbance involving Armenta. He was arrested after an officer recognized the tattoo and noticed Armenta had a blue bicycle in the back of his pickup.

PET TECHNOLOGY

A dog's life: fitness trackers help put fat pets on a diet

PRAGUE (AP) — See Spot move, barely.

When Czech entrepreneur Robert Hasek began jogging with his dog, Darwin, the three-mile runs were making the bull terrier sick with fatigue.

Hasek was surprised, thinking his dog led a healthy lifestyle. To solve the mystery, he strapped a Fitbit to Darwin and discovered he was actually only active in his presence. Otherwise, Hasek says, "he is lying, sleeping and doing nothing. He's lazy!"

The businessman sensed an opportunity and developed one of the world's first dog fitness trackers. His product is part of a growing industry of gadgets for pets that includes GPS trackers, automatic feeders, ball throwing machines for dogs to fetch, and self-cleaning litter boxes for cats. People in the U.S. will spend $72.1 billion this year on pet products and care.

BOURBON LAWSUIT

Logo: Kentucky distiller sues Dylan company over trademark

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Bob Dylan's whiskey company could soon be knock, knock, knocking on a courthouse door. Heaven Hill Distillery of Kentucky is claiming trademark infringement involving its logo.

Heaven's Door Spirits is co-owned by Dylan and debuted this year. WDRB-TV reports a Heaven Hill lawyer sent a cease-and-desist letter to Chicago-based Heaven's Door in April, saying its "stacked" logo is similar to Heaven Hill's. The lawsuit says Heaven's Door attorneys replied that they didn't expect confusion over the logos and didn't plan to change or comply with the demands.

Heaven's Door is a reference to Dylan's song "Knockin' on Heaven's Door."

The lawsuit was filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Louisville. It said Bardstown-based Heaven Hill has used the trademark for more than 80 years.

GUN PULLED-SCHOOL PARTY

THATCHER, Ariz. (AP) — A 72-year-old man faces legal problems for allegedly waving a gun at a high school dance in Arizona because he didn't like the loud music.

Police in the small southeastern Arizona town of Thatcher say Robert Layton drove to the high school parking lot around 11:45 p.m. Friday and complained about the loud music. Witnesses say Layton pulled a 9mm handgun out of his pocket and waved it around before pulling wires to disable the music.

A DJ at the event wrestled Layton to the ground and disarmed him. Authorities later said there were no bullets in the handgun.