LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) _ With apologies, tears and gestures of affection for her son, Gloria Kehoe testified he admitted killing a gun dealer and his family.

``It's got to be told, Chevie,'' Mrs. Kehoe said Wednesday from the witness stand. ``There's wrong and there's right. God won't let me live with it anymore. I'm very sorry.''

Chevie Kehoe, 26, of Colville, Wash., and Danny Lee, 26, of Yukon, Okla., are charged with racketeering, conspiracy and murder in an alleged plot to overthrow the government and set up the whites-only Aryan Peoples Republic in the Pacific Northwest. They could get the death penalty.

Among other things, they are accused of murdering gun dealer William Mueller; his wife, Nancy; and her daughter in January 1996. Selling guns taken from the family helped pay the men's living expenses, prosecutors say.

Mrs. Kehoe flashed the sign language symbol for ``I love you'' to her son when she took the stand Wednesday. She then recalled how her son told her that he and Lee donned FBI outfits, entered the Muellers' home in Tilly, Ark., and waited. They took the family by surprise, bound their hands with plastic ties and told them they were being arrested, she said.

She said that Lee and her son gave the three electric shocks on the neck to make them pass out, believing they were acting humane. Then the pair put plastic over the Muellers' heads, she said, and Kehoe beat Mueller in the head with the butt of a shotgun.

Mrs. Kehoe said her son bragged that he put the victims on ``a liquid diet'' by tossing their bodies into a western Arkansas bayou, where they were found in June 1996. They had been wrapped in plastic, bound with duct tape and weighted with rocks.

In the middle of telling the story, Mrs. Kehoe turned to her son and said: ``You know it's right, Bud. Don't look at me that way.''

Mrs. Kehoe testified that she confirmed much of her son's story in later conversations with Lee.

On cross-examination, Mrs. Kehoe agreed with some suggestions that her husband was a tyrant and that Chevie committed crimes to please him.

The court session came to an abrupt end when defense lawyer Tom Sullivan began asking Mrs. Kehoe about the Christian Identity Movement, to which she and her husband belonged.

Sullivan asked how members felt about pedophilia. He then asked specifically about how members of her family felt about the subject. After prosecutors objected, Mrs. Kehoe ran from the courtroom.