OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Thunder coach Billy Donovan can't pinpoint the best thing about Paul George.

Oklahoma City's versatile forward averages just over 20 points per game, leads the league in steals and is third in 3-point goals while shooting 43 percent from beyond the arc.

"I think that's what makes him the player he is," Donovan said. "There's a lot of players in the league that are great offensive players, but they're not great defensive players. I think arguably, it would be hard to make a case either way of what end of the floor he's better on, offense or defense, because he's that special."

George believes he's having an All-Star season in first year with Oklahoma City after being traded from the Indiana Pacers. There have been challenges as he has tried to fit in with superstars Russell Westbrook and Carmelo Anthony and it's still unclear where he will play next season because of his upcoming free agency.

Still, he has remained focused enough to be a top-notch performer. As he has found his way, the Thunder have rallied from an 8-12 start and have gone 17-8 since heading into Saturday's game at Cleveland.

"He can score it, attack the rim and he defends," Lakers rookie guard Kyle Kuzma said. "Anytime you do that, you're going to be a pretty damn good player."

George was first team All-Defense in 2014 and second-team in 2013 and 2016, and he was a defensive stopper for Team USA when it won gold at the 2016 Rio Olympics. He says without hesitation that he wants to be Defensive Player of the Year this season and feels he should have won the award in the past.

"I think I have the makeup, I think I have the intangibles," George told The Associated Press. "I'm physically capable of doing the things necessary. I thought 2013-14 I thought I was hands down the best perimeter defender on the league and I thought I was overlooked."

George is averaging a career-best 2.2 steals per game. Having another top-notch perimeter defender in Andre Roberson to share some of the responsibility allows him to gamble more than in the past. He also credits carrying less of the offensive load.

"It gives me more energy, not having to create or generate offense every possession," George said. "I can conserve energy that way. It allows me to really ramp up the defense on the other end, which is another reason why I've been able to accumulate so many steals. I have the energy, the endurance to keep flying around and keep being productive."

An example of his all-around play this season was a five-steal performance against the Sacramento Kings. He made just 7 of 17 shots but was a critical factor in Oklahoma City's win.

He hasn't always emphasized defense, but he was forced to as a rookie for the Pacers during the 2010-11 season. Frank Vogel took over as coach at midseason and saw enough grit and improvement on that end to insert him into the starting lineup in March. He came of age during the playoff series that season against the Chicago Bulls when he faced league MVP Derrick Rose. George gave up some points, but he battled and helped the Pacers hold Rose to 37 percent shooting in the series.

"My mindset was I knew I was outmatched from a standpoint of staying in front of him," George said. "That's what really got me going in trying to think things through, trying to see what I can do that can disrupt the MVP. I tried to use my length. I tried to make it as hard as possible. I knew he was going to get his 20s, get his 30s, but how can I make it as hard as possible, and how can I wear this guy down? You're not going to be able to shut down a guy like that at that stage."

From that point, George embraced the role of defensive stopper while evolving into an all-around offensive player. He was the league's Most Improved Player in 2013 and made the first of his four All-Star appearances. Last season, he averaged a career-best 23.7 points for the Pacers. Now, he can still create when needed and he has learned to be more of a catch-and-shoot scorer.

"He's a beast out there," Kings guard Buddy Hield said. "He's great. He can score the ball from three, the mid-range and the post. He's tough to guard so you have to pick your poison with him, and it's hard to do."

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Freelancers Murray Evans and Mackenzie Richardson in Oklahoma City contributed to this report.

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Follow Cliff Brunt on Twitter: www.twitter.com/CliffBruntAP

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