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Mueller Says Michael Flynn Gave ‘First-Hand’ Details of Trump Transition Team Contacts with Russians; U.S. Senator Says Saudi Crown

December 7, 2018

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<Head: Mueller Says Michael Flynn Gave ‘First-Hand’ Details of Trump

Transition Team Contacts with Russians; U.S. Senator Says Saudi Crown

Prince Complicit in Khashoggi Murder; French Government Announces Six-

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VAUSE: OK. Time for a short break now. Up next, looming indictments, some more charges and careers ruined for some who were once in Donald Trump’s inner circle, all begging the question, what if he had never won the presidency in the first place?

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

[02:30:17] VAUSE: (INAUDIBLE) is underway for a fourth season of Amazon’s The Man in the High Castle. The hit series is set in the 1960s with a dystopian alternate history which saw the allies lose World War II. Hitler is still alive at least for the first season and the defeated U.S. is divided between Nazi-control of the east and Japanese-occupation of the west.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: (INAUDIBLE) on this in 1947 two years after the capitulation of the United States of America. The bloody struggle was finally incomprehensively won.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I want you to imagine a very different version of American.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Hey, Aries.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: (INAUDIBLE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: (INAUDIBLE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It’s 1962, the United States no longer exist after the allied defeat in World War II, a first time on American (INAUDIBLE) much has change.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

VAUSE: So what would the world look like if Donald Trump hadn’t won the election two years ago? The result turn on less than a hundred thousand votes in three states. But the outcome has had a profound impact on many of those who are closest to this president. Many call this the man in the Trump tower. We’ll start with the former National Security Advisor, Michael Flynn, because, well, he’s in the news today.

He was a decorated war hero rose to be a lieutenant general, had a reputation for developing effective counterterrorism strategies in Iraq and Afghanistan. He was promoted to run the defense intelligence agency in by 2012. It was a stain on his record after being fired two years later by the Obama administration because of mismanagement and temperament issues. But then a year ago, Flynn pleading guilty to lying to the FBI denying he talked about U.S. sanctions during a conversation with the Russian ambassador in Washington.

It turns out he did. Because of a plea deal with the special counsel, Flynn is unlikely to serve time. But that conversation with the Russian ambassador took place during the transition. And there is no incoming Trump administration, no appointment of Flynn as National Security Advisor, no conversation, no lying to the FBI. And now, Flynn, is actually expected to be sentence in two weeks. And then there is Michael Cohen, the once I’d take a bullet for Donald Trump guy who’s now cooperating with the Russia investigation.

Just last week, he pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about a Moscow real estate deal which said candidate Trump was actually pursuing during the election campaign despite repeated claims by Donald Trump to the country. And that’s on top of Cohen’s guilty plea from earlier this year to eight counts of tax fraud, a false statement to a financial institution, unlawful corporate contributions, and excessive campaign contributions.

Now facing huge legal cost and felling abandoned by the president, Cohen cut a deal and he flipped. And the New York Times reporting Mr. Cohen has concluded that his life has been utterly destroyed by his relationship with Mr. Trump and now his own actions and to begin anew. He needed to speed up the legal process by quickly confessing to his crimes and serving any sentence he receives according to his friends and associates as well as of analysis of documents in this case.

It’s possible that at some point Michael Cohen could have face charges of tax fraud. But with there being the same level of scrutiny as there was after the 20116 election? No, certainly wouldn’t have been charged with lying to Congress because chances are he would never have been called to testify in the first place. Now, Paul Manafort who rose from the son of a small town mayor to international political consultant and the chairman of the Trump campaign and now a felon.

Guilty of five counts of tax fraud, two counts of bank fraud, one count of hiding a foreign bank account. For decades, he made millions advising autocrats (INAUDIBLE) and strong men around the world. But it seems he would not survive five months he served as the Trump campaign chairman. Manafort agreed to a plea deal with the special counsel’s office. But last month, federal investigators accused him of repeatedly lying and extraordinary allegation that could mean along the prison sentence and may potentially new charges as well.

At 69, Manafort could die in jail. His one hope right now is the presidential pardon. And then there’s the president’s eldest son, Don Jr. who could be facing an indictment over that Trump Tower meeting in 2016 especially if it turns out that his father’s denials of no prior knowledge actually are not true. Similar legal problems are said to be hanging over Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner. And remember the former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer, quit his job, and his credibility now in tatters and it seems he’s unemployable.

Well (INAUDIBLE) Republican Party Reince Priebus once had a promising career, now, who knows. And also, former president himself under siege reportedly unhinge and lashing out who takes little joy in the process of government. Perhaps, he too is wondering, what if?

[02:35:07] And what if Britain voted to stay in the E.U. (INAUDIBLE) where some are having second thoughts ahead of what’s expected to be another bruising day in parliament with the prime minister and her Brexit leave plan.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

VAUSE: Today, will resume in Britain’s parliament in a few hours on Theresa May’s Brexit plan. It will be the second of five days (INAUDIBLE) the prime minister is still reeling from the first day suffering a serious of embarrassing defeat on Tuesday including an unprecedented vote in parliament which found the government in contempt.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP) UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It is unfortunate for government to be in contempt of parliament which it agreed that is worst for parliament to be in contempt of the British people which is what will happen if we do not deliver on Brexit.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Prime Minister.

THERESA MAY, PRIME MINISTER OF THE UNITED KINGDOM: Can I say to my honorable friend, I absolutely agree that it is the duty I believe of this parliament. It is the duty of us as politicians to deliver on the result of the votes that the British people gave in 2016 in the referendum. They voted. We gave them the choice. They voted to leave the E.U. It is up to us to deliver that but leaving of the European Union in the interest of our country.

What it would say about the state of our democracy if the biggest vote in our history was to be rerun because the majority in this house didn’t like the outcome. And what it would do to that democracy and what forces it would unleash. This house voted to give the decision to the British people. This house promised we would honor their decision. If we betray that promise, if we betray that promised, how can we expect them to trust us again?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

VAUSE: We send Anna Stewart deep into darkest leave territory in England that (INAUDIBLE) May then voted to leave the European Union. OK. More than two years on now. They’ve seen the message. They’ve send the tears. They’ve seen where this is heading. How are they feeling now?

ANNA STEWART, CNN INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENT: Not so good, John. And just to put that into context of what happened yesterday during defeat in parliament is really quite bruising for the prime minister. It doesn’t bode well given this is the first day of five. She goes into second day of negotiations. Today, at Westminster and it doesn’t probably do much more confidence from the E.U. either looking at it.

[02:40:07] However, one of the defeats yesterday could actually help the prime minister and that’s of course one of defeat means that should have Brexit deal that she’s trying to push through get voted down next week. Actually, that could bring some more votes in because if she -- if it gets (INAUDIBLE) parliament will take control of what happens in the process next. Now, hardline Brexiters could be very worry that could lead to an even softer deal than what’s on the table or even a second referendum.

So in the interest of (INAUDIBLE) John, now, I’m hearing (INAUDIBLE) what all the people hear that voted to leave think. Do they regret that decision and what do they think of all these negotiations in Westminster?

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

STEWART: So how did you vote back in the referendum?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Vote out.

STEWART: You voted out, why?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: (INAUDIBLE) I don’t know why. I should have voted to stay and I think everybody seems to (INAUDIBLE) I’d vote to stay.

STEWART: Should they pass Theresa May’s deal next week?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Well, I’m hoping so. I mean it would cause a lot of trouble if they don’t.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We should just have a clean Brexit. We voted out. That didn’t not a little bit of that and a little bit of in.

STEWART: For the pub’s owner, the debate will come too divisive.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: So for a number of occasions (INAUDIBLE) we’re not going to talk about this anymore. As an individual (INAUDIBLE) alienate half of my customers.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

STEWART: So there’s a real sense of frustration, John. And actually, I did a poll while in the pub just to see what people wanted to happen next week and the vast majority with much rather that parliament voted down the prime minister’s deal and actually we had a hard Brexit and no deal Brexit. They’d rather full out of E.U. come March rather than still feel for holding to Brussels which is the very interesting concept and they feel a bit I guess distance up here in (INAUDIBLE) in the north of England far away from Westminster (INAUDIBLE) the way see it it’s over two years on.

They voted to leave. Why is the debate still continuing? John.

VAUSE: The smartest guy I’ve heard on three hours on television now. The smartest guy I’ve heard in three hours was the bartender. The guy who runs the pub. Anna, thank you.

STEWART: I knew you’d like him, John.

VAUSE: He was the best. Appreciate it. OK. Well, it is the time for (INAUDIBLE) reflection in Washington for a man who dedicated his life to public service. Thousands have slowly passed by the casket of former President George H.W. Bush lying in state inside the Capitol building. The Bush family visited the Capitol on Tuesday to pay their respects also to grieve mourners. President Trump and the First Lady offered condolences to the Bushes at the president’s guest house.

They were greeted by former President George W. Bush and Laura Bush. Please stay with us for an extensive coverage of the funeral of former President George H.W. Bush, 10:00 a.m. at Washington, 3:00 p.m. in London. That’s 11:00 p.m. in Hong Kong. You’ll see here on CNN. Thank you for watching CNN NEWSROOM. I’m John Vause. Please stay with us. “WORLD SPORT” is up next. You’re watching CNN.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(WORLD SPORT)

(Byline: John Vause; Sara Murray; Areva Martin; Sam Kiley; Melissa Bell; Dominic Thomas, Anna Stewart, Kate Riley)

(High: The Russia investigation heats up after a key Trump campaign figure sings like a canary to the special prosecutor trying to avoid jail time, signaling more indictments to come; A dozen U.S. senators agreed that the Saudi crown prince is complicit in Jamal Khashoggi’s death. Turkish authorities say “The Washington Post” journalist’s body was cut to pieces; The Yellow Vests protests have persuaded the government of President Emmanuel Macron to delay a tax hike on diesel fuel. The increase had been planned for January)

(Spec: Espionage; Crime; Justice; Government; Politics; Stock Markets; Middle East; War; Nazi; Robert Mueller; Russia; Michael Cohen; Paul Manafort; Michael Flynn; Donald Trump; Jared Kushner; United Kingdom; Brexit; Theresa May; George H.W. Bush)

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