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Grover Cleveland -1885-1889

February 13, 2019
Grover Cleveland

• Born: March 18th, 1837 in Caldwell, New Jersey

• Died: June 24th, 1908, Princeton, NJ

• Married to: Frances Folsom Cleveland

• Children: 5

• Other Occupations: Lawyer, State Attorney General, Mayor of Buffalo, NY, Clerk, Teacher, Governor of NY.

• Party affiliation: Democratic

• Vice Presidents: Thomas A. Hendricks and Adlai E. Stevenson

• Burial site: Princeton Cemetery, NJ

Grover Cleveland, is the only president ever been elected to two non-consecutive terms. He was the nation’s 22nd and 24th president.

As sheriff of Erie County, N.Y., he personally hanged a murderer saying that he wouldn’t give that unpleasant task to a deputy.

Cleveland married a 21-year-old women, Frances Folsom, about mid-way through his first term in office.

In his first term, he vetoed many bills, especially pension acts, and improved the civil service while his partisans clamored for the spoils of office. He opposed silver coinage and, after one term, was defeated by Benjamin Harrison who passed the Sherman Silver Bill and the McKinley Tariff.

In 1892, Cleveland did not want the presidential nomination and the Tammany Society and New York City opposed him, but he was nominated and elected by popular demand to a second term.

Cleveland faced acute economic depression when he returned to office. He blamed it on Harrison’s silver bill and had it repealed. Then he sold bonds to maintain the gold standard.

President Cleveland lost favor with the Illinois governor when he sent troops to Chicago, against state’s will, to crush a railroad strike and protect the mail. He also forced Britain to accept arbitration of the boundary dispute between Venezuela and British Guiana.

He retired to Princeton, N.J., after leaving the White House. His party convention in 1896 refused to praise his administration, but eight years later, his name was cheered at the convention of both parties.

Cleveland died January 24, 1908, of debility and old age. He was buried at Princeton.

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