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Baker Sees Housing, Transportation, Opioids As Pressing Issues

August 28, 2018

Gov. Baker. Sun staff photos can be ordered by visiting our SmugMug site.

By Katie Lannan

State House News Service

BOSTON -- One week before the state primaries, Gov. Charlie Baker pointed to his “work-focused approach” as a reason voters should return him to the corner office.

The Swampscott Republican faces a primary challenge from conservative pastor Scott Lively. Democrats Jay Gonzalez and Bob Massie are vying for their party’s nomination.

“A lot of people, when I’m out and about, tell me the thing they appreciate most about this administration is we really do focus on the work, and not the noise,” Baker said Tuesday when asked about his re-election bid.

“The state’s headed in the right direction. We have more people working than at any time in state history. Our education system is absolutely rocking it by every measure,” Baker said. “Whenever the lieutenant governor and I are out -- and we spend a lot of time out and about, she’s been to all 351 cities and towns -- the sense of momentum and positivity that we all feel is quite real, and we’d like to have an opportunity to continue to build on that.”

“The state’s headed in the right direction. We have more people working than at any time in state history. Our education system is absolutely rocking it by every measure,” Baker said. “Whenever the lieutenant governor and I are out -- and we spend a lot of time out and about, she’s been to all 351 cities and towns -- the sense of momentum and positivity that we all feel is quite real, and we’d like to have an opportunity to continue to build on that.”

Asked to identify the most pressing issues facing the state, Baker named housing, transportation and the opioid crisis.

Even though the Legislature has wrapped up work on most controversial bills for 2018, Baker said he still hopes to see a bill he filed that aims to spur housing production pass by the end of the year.

The bill remains in committee. “For young people, for young families, even for moderate and middle income families, housing is going to become a primary concern, and I hear it all the time from businesses about recruiting and retaining talent, and because our housing stock is expensive and we don’t have enough of it, a lot of people end up having to drive a very long way from where they live to where they work, which also has a lotto do with a lot of our congestion issues,” he said.

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