Excerpts from J. William Fulbright's 1966 book ``The Arrogance of Power.''

``I do not think for a moment that America, with her deeply rooted democratic traditions, is likely to embark upon a campaign to dominate the world in the manner of a Hitler or Napoleon. What I do fear is that she may be drifting into commitments which, though generous and benevolent in intent, are so far-reaching as to exceed even America's great capacities.''

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``The more I puzzle over the great wars of history, the more I am inclined to the view that the causes attributed to them _ territory, markets, resources, the defense or perpetuation of great principles _ were not the root causes at all but rather explanations or excuses for certain unfathomable drives of human nature. For lack of a clear and precise understanding of exactly what these motives are, I refer to them as the ``arrogance of power'' _ as a psychological need that nations seem to have in order to prove that they are bigger, better or stronger than other nations.''

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``The cause of our difficulties in Southeast Asia is not a deficiency of power but an excess of the wrong kind of power, which results in a feeling of impotence when it fails to achieve its desired ends. We are still acting like Boy Scouts dragging reluctant old ladies across streets they do not want to cross.''

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``It is contended by American policy-makers that if the United States makes major concessions in Vietnam, the credibility of our other guarantees and commitments will be undermined and countries which depend on American support, from Thailand to Germany, will lose faith in the United States. There may be something in this but not much.''

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``The war in Southeast Asia has affected the internal life of the United States in two important ways: It has diverted our energies from the Great Society program which began so promisingly, and it has generated the beginnings of a war fever in the minds of the American people and their leaders.''