McKINNEY, Texas (AP) _ Two weeks ago, James Riccardo Lipscomb charged up and down police barricades at a day-care center, complaining officers wouldn't let him talk to his brother holding 80 children hostage inside.

On Tuesday, Lipscomb was involved in a standoff of his own, holding his estranged common-law wife and two of their three children hostage at a public housing complex, police said.

He made no demands.

Police said the siege began Monday night when Lipscomb, 38, threatened the woman with a knife after finding another man in her apartment. He then holed up with the woman and their three children, ages 12, 9 and 7. He let the 9-year-old boy leave two hours later.

On-again, off-again negotiations began with police. Talks broke down at one point early Tuesday when Lipscomb threw a telephone out the window.

About 20 heavily armed officers surrounded the orange-brick duplex in this suburb north of Dallas. Some crouched on the ground. Others stood outside a propped-open screen door.

Officers evacuated the adjoining apartments and cordoned off the surrounding four blocks, including a neighboring church where the boyfriend and the 9-year-old waited sleeplessly through the night.

On Dec. 17, police said, Lipscomb's brother, James Monroe Lipscomb Jr., 33, stormed a day-care center in the nearby suburb of Plano. He quickly released most of the 80 children and five adults and finally surrendered the following day. He remains jailed on kidnapping charges.

The brother involved in Tuesday's standoff was at the scene of the Plano siege, complaining that police would not let him negotiate to end the crisis.

``There's no connection between this and what happened in Plano,'' Ray Simmons, McKinney assistant police chief, said Tuesday. The only similarity is that they are related, and that's it.''