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Bright & Brief

April 5, 1986

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) _ The ″refugee stew″ that fed thousands in the aftermath of the great earthquake 80 years ago was back on the menu this weekend for many San Franciscans to remind them of their long association with the Army.

The stew, prepared with historic accuracy, was one of the ingredients of Army Days, a four-day event.

Troops of the 6th Army Presidio rode to the rescue after the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906 devastated the city.

The stew was the mainstay of devastated residents, as dished up by the tens of thousands of portions by the Army cooks.

On Friday, the chow was served to a special luncheon Friday by Delta Company of the 864th Engineer Battalion. Other folks got theirs Saturday in a tent at the Presidio Museum.

The stew - a combination of beef, onions, potatoes, carrots, turnips, bay leaf and caramel - was ladled out to all comers by soldiers dressed in 1906 garb: tan pants, blue coats, leggings and campaign hats.

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URBANA, Ohio (AP) - It’s spring and thoughts are turning to love. And for toad lovers, that can be a ″trilling″ thing.

The annual rites of spring have begun for hundreds of toads, which gather in the Cedar Bog nature preserve to mate and to begin trilling.

It’s also a busy time for Terry Jaworski, who’s put toad trilling on the map.

Last year, the naturalist at the nature preserve in Champaign County brought the sex life of the American toad to national attention when he started a program to let the public know when the toads begin trilling.

Trilling is a high-pitched sound the male toads make to call out to the females. It may last two weeks, but there is one 24-hour period when the toads gather in the pond to mate.

Jaworski, who has worked at the bog for 11 years, said his efforts to publicize the event prompted requests for interviews from radio and television stations and newspapers nationwide.

″The phone rang off the hook,″ he said. ″Everybody wanted to talk to this guy who was out running around with toads.

Jaworski said some who have come to watch the toads were nature buffs, but others have filmed and recorded the enchanted evening.

Jaworski said he receives a lot of ribbing about his toads from co-workers. ″They tease me a lot. Nobody could believe normal people would come to watch such a thing.″

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