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Get accepted (by your university)

November 18, 2018

You have completed, edited and submitted your application. You watch for the mail with laser-like focus. You check your inbox compulsively for e-mail updates from your recruiter.

Waiting to learn your collegiate fate is definitely not a stress-free experience. It is an extremely vulnerable feeling knowing that your qualifications and experience are being scrutinized by a board of high-level school officials.

But if you are well-prepared and willing to work through the lengthy, sometime-tedious process of applying for college, then you can increase your chances of success.

Narrow Your Search

Conventional thinking may suggest that the more colleges you target with admissions applications, the better your chances of being accepted. Not so, say many experts.

High school students are urged to focus in on five or six key college options instead of the 20-plus that many feel they need to pursue.

In fact, a recent College Board study showed that students feel more stress for every additional college they target. Over-applying can spread your focus too thin and increase your chances of making mistakes on applications.

Foreign Language

Now more than ever, foreign language is a big plus for college admissions officials.

Some selective universities only accept students with four years of high school foreign language education. Capturing an advanced knowledge of Spanish, French or Chinese will help you during everyday life in building positive relationships with diverse populations.

Turn Things Around

Don’t sweat it if your grades from your freshman and sophomore years aren’t the greatest. Focus on performing well during the final two years of high school.

College officials are looking for candidates who have proven the ability to turn around their situations. Improving a C into a B+ over the course of a school year is an achievement that will be recognized by recruitment pros, especially if you can prove that you have a passion for learning from past mistakes to drive future success.

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