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December 31, 1987

NEW YORK (AP) _ The groom will be dressed as a steam engine and the bride will wear roller skates. There will be no throwing of rice, please, it might trip the other skaters, er, guests.

Steve Fowler, who plays Poppa, the old steam engine in ″Starlight Express,″ will marry Loretta Giles on the stage of the Gershwin Theater after the Jan. 10 matinee performance of the $8 million roller skating musical.

The audience will be invited to stay for the ceremony, said Sandra Manley, a spokeswoman for the show. The service will be performed by Fowler’s father, the Rev. John O. Fowler of the White Rock Baptist Church in Mount Vernon, N.Y.

Fowler and Giles, who hadn’t seen each other since their high school graduation in 1965, met again after the actor opened in ″Starlight Express″ last March.

″Starlight Express,″ which has music by Andrew Lloyd Webber, tells of a cross-country railroad race that takes place on an elaborate setting of bridges, ramps and catwalks.

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RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil (AP) - Rock star Tina Turner has arrived in Brazil for a concert tour she says will be the last of her career.

″I’ve been doing this for 27 years. It’s time to stop,″ she told reporters Wednesday after arriving from Los Angeles.

Turner said that after this tour, which includes shows in Brazil and Argentina, she plans to devote more time to films. Her acting career includes roles in ″Tommy″ and ″Mad Max III: Beyond Thunderdome.″

Turner and her entourage of 54 people were to spend New Year’s Day in Rio and then leave for a show in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Jan 3. She then has three shows in Brazil, including one in Rio’s giant Maracana Stadium, the world’s largest outdoor arena with a capacity of 180,000.

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HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - An American-born writer who renounced her citizenship and is a critic of U.S. foreign policy might be allowed to stay in this country because of a measure recently approved by Congress, her attorney says.

Margaret Randall, a former University of New Mexico professor who is now on the faculty at Trinity College in Hartford, last May lost a lawsuit in her fight against deportation on grounds she advocates world communism.

However, Congress in early December approved an amendment to the State Department authorization spending bill that might lessen the strength of the 1952 McCarran-Walter Immigration and Naturalization Act.

The McCarran-Walter Act permits the exclusion from the United States of anyone who advocates ″the economic, international and governmental doctrines of world communism.″

David Cole of the Center for Constitutional Rights in New York City, which has represented Ms. Randall, said the amendment might help Ms. Randall.

The amendment says: ″Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no alien may be denied a visa or (be) excluded from admission into the United States ... because of any past, current or expected beliefs, statements or associations which, if engaged in by a United States citizen in the United States, would be protected under the Constitution of the United States.″

″I was delighted,″ said Ms. Randall. ″It was a wonderful Christmas present.″

The INS has denied permanent resident status to Ms. Randall since she renounced her U.S. citizenship while living in Mexico in 1967. She returned in 1973 and has been seeking permanent resident status since 1984.

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FAIRFAX, Va. (AP) - Former Secretary of State Alexander M. Haig Jr. went right to the airport for a Florida vacation after he was released from a hospital where he was treated for an allergic reaction. first secretary of state and a former NATO commander, was treated Wednesday at Walter Reed Army Medical Center for an abscessed tooth and was given penicillin and Tylenol.

Later that day, he went to the Fairfax Hospital emergency room. Haig’s face was flushed, his tongue swollen and ″he became faint or lightheaded″ because of the medication combination, said Dr. Thomas Barsanti, an emergency room physician.

After an overnight stay at the hospital, ″they gave him a clean bill of health,″ said hospital spokesman Lon Walls.

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