OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Latest on a walkout by Oklahoma teachers seeking more funding education funding from the Legislature (all times local):

2:40 p.m.

The head of Oklahoma's largest teachers' union says if lawmakers want to end a teacher walkout, they must pass a repeal of the capital gains tax exemption and the governor must veto a repeal of a proposed lodging tax.

Oklahoma Education Association President Alicia Priest told teachers rallying at the Capitol Friday that both actions would bring an end to the teacher walkout that has stretched for five days. If not, Priest said teachers are prepared to return to the Capitol next week and for as long as it takes to bring more money to public schools.

The $5-per-night lodging tax would generate about $50 million annually but has faced fierce opposition from chambers of commerce and the hospitality industry. The capital gains tax deduction would generate about $120 million annually.

Some Oklahoma school districts say they will close for a fourth day in anticipation of a continued walkout by teachers demanding more funding for classrooms. (April 4)

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2:25 p.m.

The head of Oklahoma's largest teachers' union says if lawmakers want to end a teacher walkout, they must pass a repeal of the capital gains tax that is expected to generate about $120 million.

Oklahoma Education Association President Alicia Priest told teachers rallying at the Capitol Friday that Fallin's signature on the bill would bring an end to a teacher walkout that has stretched for five days.

The Senate already passed the bill to end the capital gains deduction for corporations and individuals, but Republican House leaders have so far been unwilling to bring the bill to the floor for a vote.

The House already adjourned Friday, and House Speaker Charles McCall didn't immediately respond to a request for comment. Monday is the earliest the bill could be considered.

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1:40 p.m.

The Oklahoma Senate has given final approval to two bills designed to generate about $40 million for public schools. GOP leaders hope they'll placate thousands of teachers who have walked off the job seeking more funding for education.

The Senate on Friday passed one bill to tax certain internet sales and another to expand tribal gambling to include games with a ball or dice, such as craps and roulette. Nearly all the revenue generated from both measures will be earmarked for public education.

Meanwhile, thousands of teachers, students and their supporters thronged the state Capitol for a fifth day, packing the hallways and chanting in the rotundas.

Both bills now head to Gov. Mary Fallin, who is expected to sign them.

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1:30 p.m.

Some of Oklahoma's largest school districts are announcing plans to remain closed on Monday, stretching a teacher walkout into a second week.

District officials from Edmond, Norman, Oklahoma City and Tulsa all announced plans to close schools beginning next week as teachers rally for more funding for public schools.

Many teachers already are back at work, especially in rural communities where local boards didn't vote to shut down. But many of the state's largest school districts have remained shuttered all week.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed legislation last week granting teacher pay hikes of about $6,100 and providing tens of millions of new dollars for public schools. But many educators said classrooms need more money and walked out of school to protest at the Capitol.

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9:30 a.m.

Debate is underway in the Oklahoma Senate over two bills designed to generate about $40 million that Republican leaders hope will placate thousands of teachers striking for more money for public schools.

The Senate is considering bills Friday to tax certain internet sales and to expand tribal gambling to include games with a ball or dice, such as craps and roulette. The $20 million projected from the sales tax would be dedicated for public schools.

Meanwhile, thousands of teachers, students and their supporters thronged the state Capitol for a fifth day, packing the hallways and chanting in the rotundas.

If approved without changes in the Senate, both bills would head to the governor's desk for her signature.

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1 a.m.

A teachers strike in Oklahoma is stretching into a fifth day, and a state union leader says he doesn't think pending revenue bills are enough to stop the walkout from extending into next week.

The Senate is expected to consider separate proposals Friday to expand tribal gambling and tax certain internet sales that are expected to generate roughly $40 million annually.

The Oklahoma Education Association's executive director, David Duvall, says he doesn't think those are enough to keep teachers from walking out again next week.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed legislation last week granting teachers pay raises of about $6,100 as well as tens of millions of new dollars for public schools. But many educators said classrooms need more money and walked out of school to protest at the Capitol.