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Letters To The Editor 9/23/2018

September 23, 2018

No self-pardon

Editor: Discussions regarding the possibility of President Trump granting a pardon to himself is ludicrous and unconstitutional.

It destroys the implementation of Article 2 Section 4 of the Constitution, which calls for the removal of a president for treason or other crimes. If self-pardon by the president is allowable, this section of the Constitution should read “The president can do no wrong,” instead of allowing for his removal.

This infraction would not be the only insult to the intent contained in the Constitution, but it destroys one of the most fundamental principles smartly written into the document. It throws our system of checks and balances out the window. Isn’t this how dictatorships form? Look at the potential damage to our governmental protection.

The main thrust of the Constitution is intended for the protection of the people for whom it is written.

The president’s main function is to serve the people. But if his service does harm to the people or the country, his removal is for our protection and safety.

JOSEPH CIANCI

DUNMORE

 

Cool to mediums

Editor: A recent Associated Press story about communication laments the age of the smartphone and how it helps create people who have lost the ability for nuance, ambiguity and depth in thinking.

All that may be true, yet we’ve been here before. Consider the ancient Greeks: Plato lamented the potential loss of the oral tradition. Plutarch told the story of Demosthenes, a Greek orator who stayed in his subterranean study to cultivate his voice.

Later, there were scholars who were fearful that Guttenberg’s development of mass-production printed material would destroy and cheapen “real” thinkers. Later, there was concern about how radio, paperbacks and television would create a world of miscreants.

Every technology brings change. Hopefully, we can collectively remember the past so as not to forget it.

JEFFREY PETRUCCI

SOUTH ABINGTON TWP.

 

Fine kettle of fish

Now that the aquarium at the Marketplace at Steamtown is finally open, how long until our president attempts to make a profit on it? Following are just a few executive exhibits:

■ Flipper the Dolphin: Namesake of the beloved 1960s TV marine mammal, he amazes spectators with his ability to flip faster than President Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen.

■ The Kelly croaker: Bearing a striking resemblance to Trump spin doctor Kellyanne Conway, this creature dwells by itself in the aquarium’s alternate reality section.

■ “The Man-o-War-Fort”: Paul for short, this fearsome stingray won’t think twice about taking you out in order to save itself.

■ Great white supremacist shark: There are good people on both sides of this deadly predator, inside and outside.

VINE MORABITO

SCRANTON

 

Fulfill civic duty

Editor: Voting is one of the most important rights and obligations we have as a citizen.

The leaders that people elect make decisions affecting them and their families, as well as their community, country and world.

Voting provides a chance to choose the decision-makers who will advocate for sound policies, beneficial to all of society and consistent with the voters’ values.

In Pennsylvania, those eligible must register to vote at least one month prior to Election Day, which is Nov. 6. The last day to register is Oct. 9.

For those who miss this deadline, your registration will not take effect until the next election.

U.S. citizens who are at least 18 years old can vote. Voters must be a Pennsylvania resident for 30 days prior to the November election in order to vote. Voters register for the address where they will live for the 30 days prior to the election. Those who recently have moved should update their voter registration.

All the information that people need to register to vote can be found at www.VotesPA.com, an official Pennsylvania government website. Here people can register to vote, or confirm or update a registration. For those who prefer to register in person or on a paper form, applications may be obtained and completed at the Lackawanna County Department of Elections, (570) 963-6737.

DIANA G. DAKEY

DALTON

 

Food chain at risk

Editor: Activists have pushed for action on climate change for years.

Forget climate change, the real threat to our existence is the catastrophic impact to our food chain.Why are we now going back to basics with organics and nongenetically modified food products, when we should have done that from the start?

It always should have been from farm fresh to plate, not processed.

But since the beginning of the industrial age, we have allowed big industry to process our food and we blindly ate their fake food that we thought was good for us. What was the rationale behind the idea to strip wheat of nutrients, bleach it and then enrich it with chemicals and preservatives? Furthermore, animals producing our milk, chicken and beef were pumped with antibiotics and growth hormones.

Isn’t it funny to see television commercials that advertise higher-quality dog and cat food for our pets that are grain-free with nongenetically modified, real ingredients than we seem to get for our own human consumption? It sure makes Purina Blue look better to eat than processed mac and cheese and other food-type products with refined ingredients.

We have allowed companies such as ConAgra, Monsanto and Union Carbide to saturate our farmlands with insecticides and herbicides. No wonder people are dying from cancer.

But activists worry about climate change? So, to all the “save the planet” zealots, why not try, “save the humans,” by bringing back sustainable and safer farming and cleaner water supplies?

AL ULUS

PHILADELPHIA

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