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BC-NM--New Mexico News Digest, NM

May 27, 2019

Good afternoon. Here’s a look at how AP’s general news coverage is shaping up today in New Mexico. Questions about today’s coverage plans are welcome, and should be directed to 505-822-9022 or apalbuquerque@ap.org

This information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories, digests and digest advisories will keep you up to date. All times are Mountain.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

TOP STORIES

ENDANGERED WOLVES-CATTLE KILLS

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. _ Mexican gray wolves roaming parts of New Mexico and Arizona have been blamed for 88 livestock deaths in the first four months of the year. An Associated Press review has found that’s nearly as many as were confirmed for all of 2018. Some ranchers and rural residents expect things to get worse as the population of endangered predators grows. Much like moving chess pieces, wildlife managers say it could be a matter of repositioning herds at key times to reduce conflicts. By Susan Montoya Bryan. SENT: 130 words. UPCOMING: 700 words with photos.

ABORTION-BLUE STATE DIVIDE

PROVIDENCE, R.I. _ Not all states where Democrats dominate politically are rushing to protect abortion rights, even as several Republican-led states have taken aggressive steps to ban the procedure. Bills to expand abortion rights have stalled or been effectively killed for the year in several states where Democrats have control. That has dismayed abortion-rights activists but reflects the diversity of views on abortion within the Democratic Party. By Jennifer McDermott and David A. Lieb. SENT: 1,400 words with photos.

NAVAJO NATION TREATY

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. _ A 150-year-old document that allowed Navajos to return to their homeland in the Four Corners region where Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Colorado meet is destined for a permanent home at the tribe’s museum. A tribal legislative committee is expected to vote Tuesday to accept an original copy of the 1868 treaty with the U.S. government. By Felicia Fonseca. SENT: 850 words with photos.

IN BRIEF:

_ CENSUS-NEW MEXICO: US Census Bureau director to visit New Mexico

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