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Parents, students don’t see eye to eye on back-to-school wardrobe

September 16, 2018
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French terry hooded denim jacket ($49), lace up skinny jeans ($49) and Steve Madden combat boots ($79.98), at macys.com

School is in session for some Western Pennsylvania students. Others begin classes this week.

While they might already have bought or ordered their first-day outfit, that’s not the end of the wardrobe for 2018-19.

School shopping is still in full force, at least through Labor Day on Sept. 3.

Parents and their children are more savvy than ever when it comes to what to buy, thanks to the ease of the internet and smartphone apps.

It takes research to find the best bargains while also finding stylish and functional clothing and accessories. Often you can find the look you want for less.

What to buy

The Tribune-Review did some comparison shopping to offer some ideas. A good place to begin is online where you can easily style a look so you have a plan on how much you want to spend and what you want to buy before you step one foot into a brick and mortar store or hit the “order now” button on a company’s website.

It’s OK to invest in staple pieces such as a blazer, crisp white shirt and a good pair of denim, says Pittsburgh Art Institute fashion instructor and Pittsburgh Fashion Week producer Suzanne Mauro. You don’t have to break the bank on other complementary pieces such as graphic T-shirts, crop top faux leather jackets and skirts and leggings.

Athleisure, a style that’s inspired by the sweatsuit, is more popular than ever, and pants and jackets and tops can be both comfortable and fashionable, Mauro says. You can find ways to dress up a pair of sweatpants. Think about the pieces you already have in your closet to make sure new items will blend in well, while at the same time giving you a smart look before you open one book.

Did you know?

According to a new survey from Ebates, American parents will not be wasting any time window shopping this back-to-school season: 81 percent plan to get all of their shopping done at four or fewer stores.

How much do parents plan to spend getting ready for back to school?

Less than $100 -- 13 percent

$100-$300 -- 38 percent

$300-$500 -- 28 percent

More than $500 -- 22 percent

The national survey, conducted online by Propeller Insights on behalf of Ebates in June 2018, was fielded among 1,001 U.S. parents and 500 U.S. teens.

Shopping may well be a beloved American pastime, but parents and teens have more complicated feelings about the back-to-school shopping season.

A majority of American parents (75 percent) and teens (73 percent) say back-to-school shopping causes tension, with the question of whether to go budget or name brand being a major stressor.

Perhaps this is why most American parents (81 percent) and teens (72 percent) say they actually dread back-to-school shopping. Parents most dread shopping for clothing and shoes (50 percent), while teens most dread shopping for school supplies (30 percent).

Teens complain parents wait until the last minute to do the shopping, insist on buying the budget item instead of the name brand and rush through the stores.

Parents complain that teens want the name brand when they can only afford the budget item, want to make too many impulse purchases and fail to agree on a budget.

Both parents (82 percent) and teens (68 percent) expect to spend the most money on clothing and shoes.

“Our Back to School survey found that shopping for back-to-school clothing is a big priority for parents and teens and also a big pain point,” says Amit Patel, CEO of Ebates, in a news release. “Ebates helps alleviate the tension by offering cash back, great deals and one-stop shopping for your back-to-school shopping needs. Ebates is the one-stop shop for everything from clothing to shoes to every other thing kids need for the new school year. With more than 2,000 retailers offering promotions and cash back, it’s easier than ever to stay within your budget while skipping the mall lines--and a lot of the stress.”

Source: ebates.com

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