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Local events to remember 9/11 victims, responders

September 11, 2018

HUNTINGTON — A Patriot Day ceremony to remember the lives lost in the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, will take place today among the Healing Field, a display of flags at Spring Hill Cemetery on Norway Avenue in Huntington.

The Healing Field is a vigil to the thousands of victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, recognizes the 75 lives lost in the 1970 Marshall University plane crash and memorializes those buried at the cemetery, including Dr. Paul Ambrose, a Huntington native and son of Marshall University who died on Sept. 11, 2001.

The event will begin with the Marshall March of Remembrance starting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11.

A procession of Marshall students will carry 75 flags from the Marshall Rec Center on 5th Avenue, south on 20th Street and on to the Spring Hill Cemetery.

The students will then place the flags in the Healing Field before joining the Patriot Day ceremony. Marshall University President Jerome Gilbert and Marshall Student Body President Hunter Barclay are expected to speak at the event.

The Patriot Day ceremony will begin immediately after with local officials, first responders, veterans of the U.S. military and patriotic music from local singers. Greater Huntington Park and Recreation District Executive Director Kevin Brady will host the ceremony, followed by light refreshments.

Wednesday, Sept. 12, will be set aside as a “Day of Reflection” before the Healing Field is taken down Thursday, Sept. 13. Participants are asked to retrieve their flags before 4 p.m. that day.

West Virginia University at Parkersburg will hold its annual 9/11 remembrance ceremony at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11, at the flagpole in front of the main building.

Jeff Sandy, secretary of the West Virginia Department of Military Affairs and Public Safety, will serve as the guest speaker for the special event, after which he will present “The Puzzle of 9/11,” at 10:30 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. in the college theater. He will discuss the events leading to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and the aftermath, how the attacks were funded and the process he led to track down Saddam Hussein’s money train. Both sessions are free and open to the public.

In case of inclement weather, the ceremony will be moved to the College Activities Center.

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