AP NEWS

Letters To The Editor 8/30/2018

August 30, 2018

3rd parties needed

Editor: Does President Trump personify the type of personality that any American, regardless of political affiliation, would give allegiance to?

Let’s be honest. There is not much of a difference between Republican and Democratic officeholders. Once elected, their primary job is personal job preservation. Trump has never benefited my life one iota, nor has Hillary Clinton.

Once upon a time, and very briefly, there were more than two primary political parties in this country.

Frankly, the time is long overdue to re-establish a viable third and even a fourth or fifth in this state and country. We have a republic; we don’t have a democracy. Open primaries, limits on corporate political spending, term limits and multiparty representation would go a long way toward ending the pathetic gridlock in Harrisburg and Washington.

If Hillary Clinton and her campaign were such blatant and obvious lawbreakers, as her detractors allege, how is it that Trump’s Justice Department hasn’t indicted her?

Change is scary and comes very slowly. But at this point in the history of our country I submit that we delude ourselves if we think our political leaders are going to address the very serious and pressing issues that confront us.

We are so wrapped up with Trump that it seems I haven’t seen any international news on CNN, MSNBC, Fox or other networks since the last eclipse. It is truly time for Americans, particularly younger Americans, to participate via the voting booth and help shape the direction in which this country will travel in the future.

JAMES MICHAEL FITZPATRICK

DALTON

 

Scars from abuse

Editor: All voices need to be heard during this paramount and pertinent time in the Catholic Church.

I speak for someone who never used her voice out of protection for her deep, embedded faith, her trust in the church and her love for God. She never wanted to report the seminarian who hurt her as a little girl. No doubt she experienced shame her whole life.

I am grateful an independent review board will look into former Scranton Bishop James Timlin’s conduct. Thanks to the University of Scranton for removing Timlin’s name from a building on campus. I grew up in Mountain Top and attended St. Jude’s Church, the youngest of a large Catholic family. Our parents nickel-and-dimed it for us all to receive a Catholic education. Our parents only wanted to instill God’s grace and love to us in their abiding faith. 

Timlin confirmed me when I was in sixth grade at St. Jude Elementary School. Through this sacrament we are “sealed with the gift of the Holy Spirit.” We are also strengthened in our faith, wisdom, courage and right judgment. I acknowledge now that he did not confirm me. It is God, my family, the congregation and my peers.

I knew about abuses in the church. But to be struck again with the grand jury report and more knowledge about Timlin leaves me shaken and disturbed about his alleged cover-ups. I’m saddened to hear he never understood the ramifications of sexual abuse and rape and how it impacts others.

I was not abused in the church but personally and professionally I know others dearly who have been.

These criminals impacted my family and many families. I know about the scars that exist from the crimes of sexual abuse. I believe Timlin needs to be brought to justice.

LORI AUSTIN

ATHENS, OHIO

 

Faith unshaken

Editor: Many organizations have experienced abuses in power by those in positions of authority.

Recently, Hollywood has had to admit the often-times use of the “casting couches” and outright rapes of young actresses and actors over the years.

The release of information about certain priests and their bosses is particularly heinous because it involves children. To be sure, there are still predatory priests out there, as there are vile sports coaches and team doctors, camp counselors, and so on.

There always will be those who prey on the young.

The extensive coverage by The Times-Tribune, however, cannot be helpful for those young adults who are trying to heal from the horrors of experiences during their youth. The Catholic Church has put systems in place to be sure these incidents no longer occur. Training has been a requirement for years.

I am a Roman Catholic. While my faith in those who administer in the church has been shaken, my faith in my religion has not wavered.

MARY JANE PETERS

DALTON

 

Change undeniable

Editor: One problem with global warming is that the changes seem so small and far away.

One degree here, one degree there and such and such will happen by the end of the century. So what? I’ll be long gone.

Actually, the seemingly small changes are very significant. Since the beginning of the industrial revolution, a mere 250 years ago — a tiny blip on the geological time scale, our burning of fossil fuels has caused massive greenhouse gas accumulation.

I am old enough to remember that rain usually came down gently and we rarely had to water our gardens. I don’t remember any storm that dumped 5 to 10 inches of rain when I was younger. Now, deluges, flood and drought are common occurrences.

Snowstorms are more erratic. Hurricanes are more powerful. Tornadoes come in multiples more often than they used to. Wildfires are more huge and intense. Environmental refugee numbers are swelling.

Despite climate change deception tactics by some big businesses and corporate-controlled media, about 80 percent of the people in the United States accept that climate change is real, according to a 2018 Gallup poll. Unfortunately, the poll also shows wide political polarization on the issue, which has become more extreme under the current administration.

No matter where you get your news, the on-the-ground truth will prevail, quashing the rhetoric. Can your grandkids and the other innocent species in the world wait for the deniers to acknowledge the truth? Do they deserve our passiveness and our ignorance?

I strongly suggest we err on the side of caution and elect people to office who don’t muzzle science and put the climate change fight at the forefront of their agendas.

KATHARINE DODGE

LAKE ARIEL

 

Sidewalk suspicion

Editor: Recently I read that the 12-year-old sidewalks around Scranton police headquarters need to be replaced and an estimated bid of $196,489 was rejected.

I thought there would be a big uproar. Does anyone think that’s the life of a sidewalk? Does anyone suspect that the city was cheated when the sidewalks were originally installed?

Apparently not.

What is wrong with our city government and mayor?

JOSEPH BRADY

SCRANTON

AP RADIO
Update hourly