LOS ANGELES (AP) _ Anton Furst, the Oscar-winning production designer who created the haunting sets and extravagant Batmobile of the movie ''Batman,'' committed suicide, officials said Monday. He was 47.

Furst jumped to his death Sunday afternoon from a parking garage about eight floors up, said Scott Carrier, a spokesman for the Los Angeles County coroner's office.

There was a witness to the jump, and police ruled out foul play, Detective Sgt. E.D. Toles said.

As a production designer, Furst worked on ''Company of Wolves'' and ''Full Metal Jacket'' and the 1989 movie ''Batman,'' which garnered him an Academy Award for his work as an art director. He shared the trophy with set decorator Peter Young.

''The whole look of a movie would be up to him,'' said Columbia Picture studio spokesman Mark Gill. ''He designed all the sets of Batman, the streets of New York, the home of Batman and his car.''

Furst wasn't involved with the 1960s television series ''Batman.''

Furst also designed the recently opened Planet Hollywood, the $15 million burger joint in New York owned by Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwarzenegger and Bruce Willis.

Born Anthony Francis Furst in Wendons Ambo, England, he graduated from the Royal College of Arts in 1969, Gill said.

He then developed ''The Light Fantastic,'' a holography show that became the touring light show for the rock group The Who in the mid-1970s, Gill said.

Furst was preparing to be both director and designer on two motion pictures when he died: ''Candide'' and ''Midknight,'' which was to star singer Michael Jackson, Gill said. The fate of those projects was unknown.

Furst, one of the early designers of laser special effects, owned London- based Holoco, a special effects company that worked on such films as ''Star Wars,'' ''Superman,'' ''Alien'' and '''Moonraker.''

Furst is survived by a daughter, Vanessa King; a son, Nicholas Sergei Furst; his mother, Pamela Furst; and a sister, Jane Wearne.