Reactions to the Census Bureau's release of 2000 population numbers used to reapportion the 435 seats in the House:

``Since 1790, these data collected during each decennial census help to tell the on-going story of America, its rich heritage and broad diversity. Most importantly, I want to thank the American people for their participation in Census 2000.'' _ President Clinton.

``Obviously we're disappointed with the projection that New York will lose two more congressional seats. But this has been happening, we've been losing population (relative to the rest of the country), since the '40s.'' _ New York Gov. George Pataki, whose state lost two of its 31 House seats.

``I think influence comes by personalities and those who are in position of influence (within Congress), not by your numbers.'' _ North Carolina State Senate leader Marc Basnight, a Democrat whose state increased its delegation size by one to 13.

``Contrast this with the 1980s, when the warning about 'turning out the lights' were commonly used to describe Michigan. This is 19 times the growth we experienced over the 80s.'' _ Michigan Gov. John Engler, whose state lost one of its 16 seats despite a modest population increase.

Texas' population increase of about 3.9 million is ``roughly the equivalent of adding a city of Dallas, a city of Houston, plus a city of San Antonio as they existed in Texas in 1990 to the Texas population.'' _ Steve Murdoch, director of the Texas State Data Center, whose state gained two seats to increase its delegation to 32.

``The governor is very pleased of course, Arizona now is the largest of the western states in terms of its congressional delegation in Washington, other than California. ... We tend to put California in its own category.'' _ Francie Noyes, spokeswoman for Arizona Gov. Jane Dee Hull. Arizona increased its House delegation by two to eight.

``Will there be two congressmen put together? Absolutely. Where is that most likely to occur? In northeast Ohio.'' _ Ohio state Republican chairman Robert Bennett, whose state lost a House seat.