JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Latest on Missouri lawmakers' work during a special session (all times local):

5:15 p.m.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson's spokeswoman says he will sign two bills on treatment courts and computer science education.

Parson in a statement praised the measures, which were passed Friday by lawmakers.

Parson called lawmakers back to the Capitol this week for a special session. He asked them to rework two bills he vetoed in July.

Parson appears satisfied with the changes. Lawmakers passed a stripped-down treatment courts bill following Parson's criticism that the earlier version unconstitutionally addressed multiple topics.

They also attempted to broaden bidding requirements for an online course intended to boost career awareness of science, technology, engineering and mathematics professions. Parson vetoed another version, saying the bidding criteria appeared to apply to only one company.

That bill also will allow Missouri high school students to apply a computer science credit toward math, science or practical art credits needed for graduation.

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11:30 a.m.

Missouri lawmakers have passed a bill to expand treatment courts.

Senators voted 29-0 in favor of the bill during a special session Friday. The bill now heads to Gov. Mike Parson.

Lawmakers passed a wide-ranging bill with a similar provision during their annual legislative session that ended in May. But Parson vetoed it, saying it appeared to unconstitutionally address a variety of other issues.

Parson called the special session to give lawmakers a chance to pass a narrower version of the bill. The measure passed Friday only deals with treatment courts.

Springfield Republican Sen. Bob Dixon says the bill will allow circuit courts to open treatment courts in order to give specialized attention to people struggling with drug and alcohol addiction and other issues.

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10:30 a.m.

Missouri high school students could apply a computer science credit toward math, science or practical art credits needed for graduation under a bill passed by state lawmakers.

Senators voted 28-1 Friday to give the measure final approval. It now heads to Gov. Mike Parson.

The measure would also create an online course intended to boost career awareness for science, technology, engineering and mathematics professions.

Lawmakers passed a similar bill during their annual legislative session that ended in May. But Parson vetoed it, saying the bidding criteria appeared to apply to only one company.

Lawmakers revised the bill in an attempt to open bidding for the online course up to more businesses.

Supporters say it will improve career readiness. Democrats cautioned that it would allow students graduate without any math credits.