WASHINGTON (AP) _ The Securities and Exchange Commission will investigate behavior in its own offices following a federal judge's finding that a worker was sexually harassed at the agency's regional office here.

Chairman David Ruder ordered the agency to hire two outside counsel: one to investigate possible disciplinary action against SEC officials involved in the case and another to review the agency's equal employment procedures, spokeswoman Mary McCue said Tuesday.

The agency, meanwhile, is trying to reach a settlement with staff attorney Catherine Broderick, who won favorable judgment last month from U.S. District Judge John H. Pratt on her sexual harassment suit.

Pratt found Ms. Broderick was forced to work in a ''sexually hostile'' atmosphere where male supervisors had romantic relationships with secretaries, who received promotions and bonuses. --- Military Tests Put Off By Court Order; Were Set To Start Wednesday

WASHINGTON (AP) - A federal judge has halted tests scheduled to begin today of a high-powered electrical generator designed to simulate one of the effects of a nuclear explosion.

U.S. District Judge John Garrett Penn, after hearing arguments from attorneys representing the Navy and the Foundation on Economic Trends, issued a temporary restraining order on Tuesday against the tests.

Navy officials had planned to begin the test Wednesday with Empress II barge in international waters about 15 miles off the Virginia-North Carolina coast.

The restraining order, which expires at noon Friday, was issued to give the government time to file a motion in response to a suit that demands environmental impact studies be done before the test goes forward.

The Empress II is equipped with two diesel generators and a huge antenna system, capable of sending ''pulses'' of electrical power into the atmosphere at power levels up to 7 million volts to test a phenomenon known as electro- magnetic pulse, or EMP.

The Navy maintains the testing will have no affect on human or marine life. --- English To Probe Agencies About Role In War On Drugs

WASHINGTON (AP) - Rep. Glenn English says he's launching a series of hearings this week into the federal offensive in the war on drugs to glean information that will serve as the cornerstone of a 1988 drug bill.

''Congress is going to pass an omnibus drug bill in the next few months, and it is essential to develop a record of exactly what happened to the 1986 act,'' the Oklahoma Democrat said Tuesday. ''We have to know where we are if we want to know where we're going.''

English plans to ask more than a dozen federal agencies - from the FBI to the Forest Service - about their role in drug-fighting effort. The chairman of a House justice panel, English said he wants to know whether funding, equipment and authority parceled out to the agencies in the 1986 omnibus drug bill have been properly used.

''The hearings will provide a good indication of how confident the agencies are (in fighting drugs) and how well they spent the money,'' said English. ''It's good for the Congress to find out what happened to the 1986 drug bill.''