AP NEWS

Texas added 100K voters in just two weeks

October 10, 2018

Over the past two weeks, Texas added nearly 100,000 new voters to its rolls and nearly a half million more people just since the March primary elections.

New numbers from the Texas Secretary of State show a record of at least 15.7 million voters will be eligible to vote on Nov. 6 in the midterm elections which feature one of the hottest U.S. Senate races in the country, the governor’s race, and more than a half dozen highly competitive congressional races.

The two-week surge is more in line with the number of voters Texas typically adds in an entire year year. From 2002 to 2014, Texas added 116,000 voters a year.

And the number is likely to rise as last-minute voter registrations are reported to the Texas Secretary of State’s office. The last day to register to vote in time for the midterm elections was on Tuesday. The numbers come even as more than 2,000 voters had their registrations deemed incomplete because they registered online via the national Vote.org. Those voters have 10 days to resubmit their registrations.

Early voting starts on Oct. 22.

Across Texas, voter registration increased 2 percent since March primary elections.

In that timeframe, no county has seen a jump in voter registrations larger than Hays County, just south of Austin and home to San Marcos, one of the fastest-growing metro areas in the United States. Hays has reported an 8 percent increase in voter registration since the March primary elections.

Major metro counties like Dallas, Bexar, and Harris counties have all seen their voter registrations jump 3 percent since March.

Suburban counties have seen a bigger jump. In Fort Bend and Montgomery counties near Houston, voter registrations grew 4 percent since March. In Collin County near Dallas, voter registrations climbed 5 percent.

In Guadalupe and Comal counties north of San Antonio, voter registrations jumped 5 percent.

Texas Secretary of State Rolando Pablos has said the surge of voter registrations and enthusiasm in this midterm election cycle is akin to what election officials often see in presidential election cycles.

AP RADIO
Update hourly