AP NEWS

Baraboo Burger Company features students’ burger this month

April 4, 2019

This month, three Baraboo High School students will get to see their own creation offered on the menu of a local restaurant.

Baraboo Burger Company is featuring the Italiano Burger, a beef patty with Italian seasoning topped with homemade pesto sauce, pancetta, tomato and provolone cheese on a buttered, toasted bun, as its burger of the month. Developed by Ashley Vorndran, Noah Anderson and Zoe Smith of Baraboo, the burger won the first “Hungry Games” in January, a competition between students from four area high schools.

“I feel very supported,” Vorndran said. “I feel like the community did not have to do this and I feel like it’s really cool that they did, especially because they’re giving money back. That was really cool of them.”

According to a Baraboo Burger Company Facebook post, a portion of the burger’s profits will be donated to the BHS culinary program.

The students said the restaurant’s staff watched them make the burger — which only took the trio one class period to perfect — at the competition. Now that they’ve shared the recipe with its cooks, Baraboo Burger Company will be able to reproduce it for customers.

“I think that’s a unique experience and it’s something that not everyone gets to experience in high school — to have something they made in a professional restaurant,” Anderson said.

They hope patrons will like the burger. Combining pesto with a burger might seem like an unusual choice, but Smith said the flavors complement each other.

“I think they’re going to be surprised,” Vorndran said. “It’s actually really good.”

The trio also were featured at a Hungry Games booth in Sysco Baraboo’s Spring Food Show in Wisconsin Dells Tuesday, which they attended with their teacher, Terra Disterhaft, and fellow Baraboo competitors.

While none of the three are currently considering a culinary career, Anderson noted the value of experiencing things like the food show and the BHS ProStart culinary class, even for those who don’t often cook. Smith said everyone can benefit from learning basic culinary skills.

“(The class) opens your eyes to a lot, honestly,” Anderson said.