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BC-AP--Europe News Digest, AP

January 14, 2015

TOP STORIES FROM EUROPE AT 1205 GMT

FRANCE-ATTACKS

PARIS — Charlie Hebdo’s defiant new issue sold out before dawn around Paris on Wednesday, with scuffles at kiosks over dwindling copies of the paper fronting the Prophet Muhammad. In the city still shaken by the deaths of 17 people at the hands of Islamic extremists, a controversial comic who appeared to be praising the men was detained. By Lori Hinnant. SENT: 840 words, photos.

TURKEY-CHARLIE HEBDO

ANKARA, Turkey — Police on Wednesday stopped trucks as they left a pro-secular newspaper’s printing center and checked the paper’s content after it decided to print a selection of Charlie Hebdo caricatures, the paper said. Cumhuriyet newspaper said police allowed distribution to proceed after verifying that the satirical French newspaper’s controversial cover featuring the Prophet Muhammad was not published. SENT: 230 words.

UKRAINE-AID CRUNCH

DONETSK, Ukraine — Valentina Dudareva’s voice cracks with despair as she stands in the snow, surveying the bombed-out windows of her apartment block in Donetsk, the separatist capital in eastern Ukraine. Cold, poor and hungry, Dudareva is among the masses of people trapped by fighting between the government and Russian-backed militias, reliant on outside help that often fails to arrive. More than six months have passed since Dudareva last received her pension — and the Russian food aid packages so trumpeted by rebel authorities are nowhere to be seen. By Mstyslav Chernov and Peter Leonard. SENT: 800 words, photos.

EUROPE-BOND PURCHASES

FRANKFURT, Germany — An adviser to the European Court of Justice says the European Central Bank’s offer to purchase government bonds of troubled countries — a key backstop in Europe’s struggle against its debt crisis — is legal in principle. The bond purchase program helped calm market turmoil that threatened to break up the euro bloc when it was announced in 2012. It was never implemented, but its mere existence reassured markets. By David McHugh. SENT: 400 words, photos.

With: EUROPE-STIMULUS DEBATE

ITALY-POLITICS

ROME — Italy’s President Giorgio Napolitano has resigned as promised, less than two years after accepting an unprecedented second term as head of state because squabbling lawmakers couldn’t agree on a successor. SENT: 130 words.

RUSSIA-ECONOMY

MOSCOW — Russia’s finance minister has promised to maintain a tight lid on spending as the country faces its worst economic downturn in 15 years. Anton Siluanov said an earlier plan to boost government spending by nearly 12 percent this year is unrealistic, and some of the planned expenditures should be cut. SENT: 270 words.

BRITAIN-TAXI FEUD

LONDON — A European Union court has handed London’s embattled taxi drivers some good news — they can keep their right to drive in bus lanes. Drivers of London’s iconic — but expensive — black cabs face increasing competition from cheaper private cab firms and drivers from ride-sharing apps such as Uber. SENT: 130 words.

AUSTRIA-HITLER’S HOUSE

VIENNA — Austria’s government is looking at options that would allow it to expropriate the house where Adolf Hitler spent his early childhood. The move is the latest in efforts by the government to ensure that the house is not turned to a use that makes it even more of a shrine for Hitler’s admirers. By George Jahn. SENT: 280 words, photos.

BRITAIN-BURBERRY

LONDON — Luxury goods maker Burberry is reporting falling sales in Asia because pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong disrupted trade during China’s crucial “Golden Week” national holiday. SENT: 130 words.

CZECH-MATCH-FIXING

PRAGUE — Czech Football Association officials, referees, and club administrators — 25 people in all — are police suspects in a 2013 bribery case that hit Czech lower-tier leagues. In a statement on Wednesday noting their investigation was complete, police say five people are suspected of paying bribes, and 20 others allegedly accepted bribes to fix matches. SENT: 120 words.

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