AP NEWS

The Latest: House passes $43 billion Democratic budget

June 4, 2019

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The Latest on the state budget (all times local):

10:45 p.m.

The House of Representatives has approved a two-year, $43 billion deal reached between legislative Democrats and Democratic Gov. Ned Lamont.

The Democratic-controlled chamber voted 86-65, with five Democrats joining the Republicans in opposition, to advance the bill to the Senate. The vote followed nearly nine hours of debate.

While Republicans criticized the plan for increasing taxes by about $2 billion over two years and increasing spending levels in both years, Democrats insisted the budget is a good one that remains under the state’s constitutional spending cap, sets aside $2 billion in a reserve account and addresses some major issues, such as a pending lawsuit by the state’s hospitals.

The Senate, also controlled by Democrats, is expected to vote Tuesday on the bill.

The General Assembly’s regular session ends Wednesday.

__

2 p.m.

Connecticut lawmakers are planning to vote on a new two-year, $43 billion state budget that Democrats say puts the state on a path to fiscal stability but that Republicans argue is a “hodgepodge of ideas” with no plan for the future.

The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives was debating the massive 550-plus-page bill Monday afternoon.

Democratic House Majority Leader Matt Ritter of Hartford says the plan covers a projected two-year, $3.7 billion gap. He says it provides stability by setting aside $2 billion in a budget reserve account, addressing a lawsuit filed by Connecticut’s hospitals and rescheduling teacher pension payments.

Republican Sen. Len Fasano of North Haven says the proposed budget provides “no direction for the state.” Rather, he says it increases taxes and includes “a whole bunch of Democratic ideas.”

__

1:25 p.m.

Connecticut lawmakers are expected to vote on a new two-year, $43 billion state budget that Democrats say puts the state on a path to fiscal stability but that Republicans argue is a “hodgepodge of ideas” with no plan for the future.

The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives planned to begin debating the massive 550-plus-page bill Monday afternoon.

Democratic House Majority Leader Matt Ritter of Hartford says the plan covers a projected two-year, $3.7 billion gap. He says it provides stability by setting aside $2 billion in a budget reserve account, addressing a lawsuit filed by Connecticut’s hospitals and rescheduling teacher pension payments.

Republican Sen. Len Fasano of North Haven says the proposed budget provides “no direction for the state.” Rather, he says it increases taxes and includes “a whole bunch of Democratic ideas.”

All contents © copyright 2019 The Associated Press.All rights reserved.