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Woods ties record and takes 2-shot lead

December 7, 2013

THOUSAND OAKS, California (AP) — Tiger Woods had a birdie putt on every hole and made 10 of them for a 10-under 62, tying his course record at Sherwood Country Club and giving the tournament host a two-shot lead over Zach Johnson going into the weekend at the World Challenge.

“It was good today,” Woods said with a broad smile, perhaps because there was little else to say.

“It was a clinic,” said Graeme McDowell, the defending champion who played alongside Woods in the second round and had a 67.

Woods was at 11-under 133 and will be paired in the last group Saturday with Johnson, who missed a few good birdie chances on the back nine but still managed a 68. Johnson is a two-time runner-up at the World Challenge, both times to Woods.

Matt Kuchar had a 68 and was three shots behind, and no one else was closer than five shots. What could challenge Woods, along with everyone else, is a forecast of rain and then wind for the final two days.

Woods didn’t feel good about his swing until a tee shot to 15 feet on the par-3 third hole, and while he had to settle for par, he at least liked the way the ball left his club.

“It was the first swing I made, even during warm-up, that felt really good,” Woods said. “And I tried to keep that feeling the rest of the day, and I did. I hit a lot of good shots after that.”

It was the 10th time Woods has shot 62 or lower in a tournament. He went on to win six of those events.

No one is ready to concede this tournament to Woods, except for those at the far end of this 18-man field. Hunter Mahan had an 80, Dustin Johnson had a 79 and Rory McIlroy, coming off a win at the Australian Open, had a 77.

“Amazing what Tiger did out there. It’s just some incredible golf,” Kuchar said. “I kind of felt sorry for Graeme McDowell. I saw he posted a 5-under-par round, and it must have felt like it was 2 or 3 over. It’s tough when you’re paired with a guy like that. It makes you feel like you’re not doing much. But the rest of us just go about our business.”

Even after watching what he felt like was an exhibition — Woods’ golf, not the tournament — McDowell figured he could still defend his title if he could nail down the speed of the greens, which are running on the fast side.

That’s what set Woods apart on another chilly day at Sherwood. Not only did he make the putts, he rarely was in a position where he had to stress over par. The lone exception came on the par-3 12th, when Woods was in such a precarious spot above the hole that he had no intention of trying to make birdie. He would have had to start the ball high on a ridge to get it to roll near the hole, and that would mean more speed going by. So he aimed for the low side and made the 10-foot par putt coming back.

“I don’t think I’ve seen them quite this fast unless we get Santa Ana’s blowing when it’s dry,” Woods said. “I mean, this is the last tournament of the year for a lot of us. I’d think they’d make it a little easier on us. But they gave it to us pretty good the last couple days. You miss the ball in the wrong spots, you’re making bogeys.”

Woods never went more than two holes without a birdie. One of the few times he was above the hole, Woods hit his putt on a perfect line with the right pace and dipped his knees when it dropped in the right side of the cup.

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