AP NEWS
Related topics

AM-Prep: Kickers

September 17, 2018

COMMUTER CAUGHT SHAVING ON TRAIN

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — Some people try to shave a little time off their daily commute. But one fellow has been spotted using his time by shaving during his commute. And transit officials in New Jersey are none too pleased. A fellow rider on the Northeast Corridor line of New Jersey Transit spotted a man lathering up and giving himself a shave on the train. The witness took video and posted it online. Some commentators were impressed by the man’s ability to give himself a close shave on a moving train. Others were grossed out. Either way, the man who shaved himself on the rail line was out of line. NJ Transit says it prohibits bathing or shaving on trains and buses. By the way — after the shave, the fellow who did his “manscaping” — ordered a beer.

SQUIRRELS FRUSTRATE FARMERS

STANDISH, Maine (AP) — Usually squirrels are considered little more than furry pals. But they’ve managed to make themselves a nuisance to farmers in New England — because they have been nibbling their way through some of their prized crops. The little rascals have been fattening themselves for the winter by feeding on apple orchards, pumpkin patches and corn fields. Robert Randall, who has a 60-acre orchard in Standish, Maine, says he never seen the squirrels act so, well, squirrely. He says they are “raising some hell this year.” You don’t have to be a farmer to notice it. Drivers along New England’s roads have seen more than a few squirrels — as roadkill. Wildlife officials say a bumper crop of acorns and other food boosted the squirrel population this summer. It’s expected populations will be back to normal soon.

UBER GLITCH LEAVES DRIVERS UNPAID

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — If your Uber driver seems a little irked these days — try to sympathize. The company has been dealing with a glitch that is keeping its drivers from getting their pay right away. The Mercury News of San Jose reports the problem began on Friday — and had persisted into the next day. A rep for the company says the pay problem stems from an issue with its “Instant Pay” feature that allows drivers to cash out their earnings immediately. Frustrated and angry drivers have gone on social media, saying they don’t like working for free — and that they need the instant payouts to keep their gas tanks filled.

by Oscar Wells Gabriel II

AP RADIO
Update hourly