IN THE NEWS: MEDIA COMBOS IN THE AFTERMATH OF AT&T-TIME WARNER MERGER

NEW YORK (AP) — Now that the AT&T-Time Warner corporate marriage has gotten the blessing of the courts, expect any number of companies to make a beeline for the altar. The first in what may be a flurry of potential deals, Comcast has made a $65 billion dollars for the entertainment arm of Fox. If Comcast succeeds in outbidding Disney for Fox, it would give a major cable distributor control even more channels on its lineup and those of its rivals. With that comes fear that the merger could lead to higher cable bills or hinder online alternatives. One observer says in the wake of the ruling in the AT&T-Time Warner takeover, even companies that may not need to get bigger right now may feel they must — to keep from being overshadowed by a rival.

IN THE NEWS: SCHOOL SHOOTING VIDEO GAME WANTS TO KEEP SELLING IT

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — What do you think of the idea of a video game that is set in a scene of a mass shooting at a school? Parents and educators have been calling for the project to be shelved. But now the game's developer is promising to continue selling it online. "Active Shooter" was created by a Moscow developer and is marketed by Acid Software. In a Twitter post, the company says it won't be censored — and says it has free expression rights to continue to make and sell the title.

ON THE WEB: AUSTRALIAN MAN SUES GOOGLE

CYBERSPACE (AP) — An Australian man has won a court battle over a Google search. The man has won the right to sue Google, claiming the online search engine defamed him. Back in 2004, the man was shot in the back at a restaurant in Melbourne. He says when people Google his name, the results indicate he had ties to the Melbourne criminal underworld. The matter now goes back to the Victoria Supreme Court for trial. For its part, Google says it can't be held liable for results generated by a search.

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Online:

Google site: http://www.google.com

IN STORES: YETICASTER USB MICROPHONE SYSTEM

WESTLAKE VILLAGE, Calif. (AP) — Got a dad who's into doing podcasts? Or any kind of recording, for that matter? To help him bring out his "A'' game, the people who make Blue Microphones have a solution that can turn the most modest setup into a pretty awesome recording studio. At the heart of the YetiCaster system is Blue's Yeti USB microphone. It features Blue's tri-capsule technology that lets users churn out studio-quality recordings. By flipping a switch, you change the pattern from cardoid, bidirectional, omnidirectional and stereo. A second part of the system is the Compass Premium Broadcast Boom Arm. It has a system of built-in springs to hold it in place — and a channel to thread the cable through the arm. And — there is the Radius III Custom Shockmount, which is able to keep the Yeti mic from succumbing to noise, shock and outside shaking.

The YetiCaster system retails for $199.99

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Online:

Blue Microphones YetiCaster site: https://www.bluedesigns.com/products/yeticaster

by Oscar Wells Gabriel II

Follow Oscar Wells Gabriel II on Twitter at https://twitter.com/OWGabriel2