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Stamford cooling centers are open, city says

August 28, 2018

STAMFORD — A heat advisory is in effect for Stamford and surrounding areas as temperatures reach the low to mid 90s, with heat indexes making it feel as high as 104 degrees.

The advisory will be in effect until Wednesday at 9 p.m.

Local officials are warning people to stay indoors if possible. The heat and humidity can lead to heat stress during outdoor activities. Seniors, infants and those with chronic health issues are the most at risk.

A cold front approaches Wednesday night and gradually moves through the region on Thursday. There will be a chance for showers and thunderstorms on Thursday with temperatures in the 80s.

A heat advisory is issued when the combination of heat and humidity is expected to make it feel like it is 95 to 99 degrees for two or more consecutive days, or 100 to 104 degrees for any length of time.

Taking precautions

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy advised Connecticut residents, particularly those who are most vulnerable, to take precautions ahead of the high temperature conditions that are expected to impact the state through Wednesday.

Stamford’s cooling centers will be open to the public. In addition to public access locations like the Ferguson Library and Stamford Town Center, the following places can be utilized as cooling centers: Stamford Government Center, Glenbrook Community Center, Jewish Community Center (bring photo ID), Chester Addison Community Center, and Building One Community.

“A few steps can greatly reduce heat-related issues, especially for the elderly, the very young and people with respiratory ailments who are more susceptible to the effects of high temperatures,” Malloy said. “Any resident looking for a place to cool off should call 2-1-1 to find out where their closest cooling center is located.”

Although anyone can suffer from heat-related illness, some people are at greater risk than others:

Infants and young children are sensitive to the effects of high temperatures and rely on others to regulate their environments and provide adequate liquids.

People 65 years of age or older may not compensate for heat stress efficiently and are less likely to sense and respond to change in temperature.

People who are overweight may be prone to heat sickness because of their tendency to retain more body heat.

People who overexert during work or exercise may become dehydrated and susceptible to heat sickness.

People who are physically ill, especially those with heart disease or high blood pressure, or who take certain medications, such as for depression, insomnia, or poor circulation, may be affected by extreme heat.

Signs of heat stroke include skin that is hot and dry with red spots, mental confusion, loss of consciousness, and convulsions

Some tips to stay safe include having you family doctor’s phone number handy, drinking more fluids, staying indoors in an air-conditioned place, and visiting adults at risk at least twice a day.

Forecast

Wednesday: Sunny, with a high near 92. Heat index values as high as 99. West wind 5 to 10 mph.

Wednesday Night: Mostly clear, with a low around 73. Southwest wind 5 to 7 mph.

Thursday: A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 9am. Mostly sunny, with a high near 85. West wind 5 to 9 mph.

Thursday Night: A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms before 2am. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 64.

Friday: Mostly cloudy, with a high near 76.

Friday Night: A 30 percent chance of showers before 5am. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 63.

Saturday: Mostly cloudy, with a high near 74.

Saturday Night: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 63.

Sunday: Partly sunny, with a high near 78.

ignacio.laguarda@hearstmediact.com

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