Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES RAGE ON

Twin wildfires in Northern California threaten some 10,000 homes and pose yet another struggle for exhausted and overworked firefighters.

2. MANAFORT TRIAL SET TO BEGIN

Trump's former campaign chairman is facing charges of tax evasion and bank fraud — the first trial arising from special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

3. IRAN SKEPTICAL OF TRUMP'S OFFER

Iran's semi-official ISNA news agency quotes political adviser Hamid Aboutalebi as saying that if the president wants talks with Rouhani, the U.S. needs to rejoin the international nuclear deal he abandoned.

4. SENATORS SEEK ANSWERS ABOUT MIGRANT FAMILY SEPARATIONS

The Senate Judiciary Committee's hearing may also explore reports of sexual and other abuse of migrants at detention facilities.

5. RIVAL KOREAS DISCUSS EASING MILITARY CONFRONTATION

The meeting between generals comes days after North Korea returned the reported remains of U.S. war dead, the most recent sign of blossoming diplomacy.

6. UNDERCOVER VIDEO SHOWS PIG ABUSE

Footage showing the animals being kicked, hit and punched at a supplier to meat giant JBS also highlights common practices that are slowly being changed in the pork industry.

7. WHO'S LEADING THE WAY ON INCLUSION

Levi Strauss, Yelp and Lyft are leading a coalition of 1,200 businesses and cities that are pledging not to discriminate against race and sexual orientation.

8. BLACK BOSTONIANS TAKE ISSUE WITH FAMOUS BOSTON LANDMARK

Activists are threatening to boycott Faneuil Hall because its 18th-century namesake was a slave owner.

9. MALAYSIA'S CIVIL AVIATION CHIEF QUITS OVER FLIGHT 370 LAPSES

The resignation comes after a report highlighted shortcomings in the air traffic control center during the Malaysia Airlines jet's disappearance four years ago.

10. HOW USERS DESCRIBE TWITTER EXPOSE

A pair of Twitter users whose posts exposing offensive tweets from baseball players went viral say their aim was not malice, but accountability in "toxic" culture, they tell AP.