COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Latest on Ohio's election (all times local):

11:20 p.m.

Cleveland's mayor has won a record fourth, four-year term, while Cincinnati's mayor has won a second term and Toledo voters have picked a new mayor.

With some 90 percent of the votes counted in Cleveland, Frank Jackson had 60 percent to 40 percent for councilman Zack Reed.

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley called himself the "comeback kid," referring to councilwoman Yvette Simpson topping him in the primary. He had 54 percent to her 46 percent with all precincts reporting unofficial returns.

In Toledo, Lucas County Treasurer Wade Kapszukiewicz (KAP'-suh-kav'-ich) defeated Paula Hicks-Hudson, who was seeking her first full term. The challenger led with 56 percent of the vote with 88 percent of precincts reporting, and Hicks-Hudson conceded.

All six candidates are Democrats in those three nonpartisan mayoral votes.

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10:30 p.m.

Cleveland's mayor is heading to a city-record fourth term.

With more than half of the precincts reporting, Frank Jackson had 61 percent to 39 percent for councilman Zack Reed.

Meanwhile, Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley has claimed victory, calling himself the "comeback kid" after councilwoman Yvette Simpson topped him in the primary. However, Simpson isn't ready to concede, trailing 53 percent to 47 percent with 111 of 188 precincts reporting unofficial returns.

In Toledo, Mayor Paula Hicks-Hudson has fallen behind Lucas County Treasurer Wade Kapszukiewicz (KAP'-suh-kav'-ich). The challenger led with 58 percent of the vote with a little more than half the vote in.

All six candidates are Democrats in those three nonpartisan mayoral votes.

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9:15 p.m.

Incumbent mayors took early leads in three of Ohio's largest cities.

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley led with 59 percent of the vote over councilwoman Yvette Simpson's 41 percent, with 25 of 188 precincts reporting unofficial returns.

Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson and Toledo Mayor Paula Hicks-Hudson led after tallies of early voting. Jackson had 62 percent to city councilman Zack Reed's 38 percent. Jackson is seeking a city-record fourth term.

Hicks-Hudson had 52.5 percent of the early vote to 47.5 percent for Lucas County Treasurer Wade Kapszukiewicz (KAP'-suh-kav'-ich). She is seeking her first full term.

All six candidates are Democrats in those three nonpartisan mayoral votes.

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8:20 p.m.

Ohioans have voted to expand crime victims' rights to more closely match those of the accused.

Approval of Issue 1 Tuesday places the new guarantees into the state constitution. They include notice of court proceedings, input on plea deals and the ability for victims and their families to tell their story.

Dubbed Marsy's Law for Ohio, the measure was championed by California billionaire Henry Nicholas, whose sister was stalked and killed by her ex-boyfriend.

The campaign had spent $8.2 million as of mid-October on its effort, which included an ad featuring "Frasier" actor Kelsey Grammer.

The effort faced no organized opposition. However, the state public defender, the state prosecuting attorneys' association and the ACLU all raised concerns over unintended consequences and urged Ohioans to vote "no."

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8:15 p.m.

Ohio voters have rejected a ballot measure seeking to curb prescription drug prices paid by the state for prisoners, injured workers and poor people.

The campaign fight over Issue 2, dubbed the Ohio Drug Price Relief Act, was the most expensive in state history.

The measure would have required the state to pay no more for prescription drugs than the Department of Veterans Affairs' lowest price, which is often deeply discounted.

The pharmaceutical industry spent more than $50 million to oppose the measure, saying it would reduce access to medicines and raise prices for veterans and others.

Supporters, led by the California-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation, spent close to $20 million in support, saying it would save the state millions and could force the industry to reduce prices elsewhere.

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10:40 a.m.

Ohio's elections chief says fewer absentee ballots were requested ahead of Tuesday's election than for an equivalent election cycle two years ago, but more of those ballots have been cast.

Secretary of State Jon Husted (HYOO'-sted) says almost 450,000 Ohioans had requested absentee ballots as of Monday, and over 385,000 of them had been cast.

He says that compares to nearly 484,000 absentee ballots requested and over 383,000 cast by the comparable point in the 2015 election.

Three state issues were on the ballot that year. This year, there are two.

Absentee ballots returned by mail had to be postmarked by Monday. Voters still can return completed absentee ballots by hand-delivering them to their local elections boards before the polls close at 7:30 p.m.

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8:40 a.m.

The secretary of state's office says polling places around Ohio opened for voting without any reports of major problems on Tuesday morning.

Election directors in parts of northeastern Ohio had relocated some polling sites after a severe storm over the weekend caused power outages across the region.

Ohio voters are deciding ballot issues that would place limits on drug prices and expand victims' rights in criminal proceedings.

Issue 1 is meant to expand crime victims' rights. Opponents say such laws elsewhere have had unintended, negative consequences.

Issue 2 aims to cut prescription drug prices for the poor, injured workers and prisoners. Opponents say it could reduce access and raise some prices.

Several mayoral races also will be decided in this election.

The polls are open until 7:30 p.m.

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12:10 a.m.

Ohio voters will decide ballot issues on Tuesday that would place limits on drug prices and expand victims' rights in criminal proceedings, along with several mayoral races.

Issue 1 is meant to expand crime victims' rights. Opponents say such laws elsewhere have had unintended, negative consequences.

Issue 2 aims to cut prescription drug prices for the poor, injured workers and prisoners. Opponents say it could reduce access and raise some prices.

While low voter turnout is typical in off-year elections, early voting figures in some counties indicate voter interest is higher than normal, particularly in city elections with incumbents facing spirited challenges.

Democrats have continued to do well in large urban areas, while Republicans have dominated recent statewide votes led by Donald Trump's presidential win last year.