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Man Awarded $1.2 Million After Vocal Chords Crushed In Police Choke- Hold

October 15, 1988

WASHINGTON (AP) _ A District of Columbia man whose vocal chords were crushed by a police choke-hold after he got into a dispute with officers at the scene of a traffic accident has been awarded $1.2 million.

A Superior Court jury on Friday granted the award to Townsend W. Janey.

Janey, 51, had come to the scene of a May 1985 accident involving his son, Derek, and berated police for taking too long to arrive when an officer put him in a choke-hold.

″I was moving my hand back and forth, trying to get some air in there, and I felt I was passing out but I don’t ever remember hitting the ground,″ he recalled on Friday.

Janey was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct, but the case was thrown out by a D.C. judge a month later, and three investigations by the city found that the arrest was groundless and excessive force had been used.

Two officers were disciplined in connection with the incident, but city officials said the award was excessive and would be appealed. --- Marines Return Super Stallion Copters to Service

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Marine Corps’ fleet of CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters is back in operation after being suspended following a one-time inspection prompted by the discovery of a defective nut.

Lt. Col. Fred Peck, a Marine spokesman in Washington, said Friday all 93 of the Super Stallions were returned to service after emergency inspections failed to turn up any other defective nuts.

The heavy-lift transport copters, almost all of which are based inside the United States, were temporarily grounded last Sunday after mechanics at a training squadron at the Tustin, Calif., Marine Corps Air Station found a scratch on a main transmission gearbox nut.

The Naval Air Systems Command has concluded, however, that some of the ″transmission barrel nut assemblies″ purchased by the Defense Logistics Agency for the Super Stallions are defective and they are being removed from the inventory, Peck added. --- Reagan Salutes Discovery Astronauts

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Reagan, borrowing a phrase from Vice President George Bush says the five Discovery shuttle astronauts are ″America’s heroes.″

″Thank you for taking us into space ... and welcome home,″ Reagan said, evoking a round of applause from the crowd which included many NASA employees and some of their family members attending the Rose Garden ceremony.

″The vice president was right last night - you are America’s heroes. You are his heroes and mine ... what you have done for the program and the country will be long remembered,″ Reagan told the five-member crew, referring to a statement made by Bush during the presidential debate with Michael Dukakis.

The Discovery flight, which began on Sept. 29, was the first shuttle mission since the Challenger blew up on liftoff, killing all seven aboard. --- Interest Rates Fall

WASHINGTON (AP) - Interest rates on 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages have fallen to the lowest level in five months this week, according to a nationwide mortgage survey.

The Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., a government-chartered corporation owned by savings institutions and known as Freddie Mac, said Friday that fixed-rate mortgages averaged 10.33 percent this week, down from 10.38 percent last week.

That was the lowest since rates averaged 10.32 percent in the week ending May 6. The averages do not include add-on fees known as points. --- Senate Approves 11 Judicial Appointments

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Senate has voted approval of 11 of President Reagan’s judicial appointments, but at least 15 others have virtually no chance of approval before the chamber adjourns for the year.

Approved Friday were Richard L. Voorhees, Gastonia, N.C., for U.S. district judge for the Western District of North Carolina; state common pleas Judge Richard L. Nygaard of North East, Pa., for the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals; U.S. District Judge John M. Duhe Jr., of Lafayette, La., for the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals; and Paul V. Gadola, Grand Blanc, Mich., for the Eastern District of Michigan.

Also approved were Alex R. Munson, Saipan, for the Northern Mariana Islands; Norwood C. Tilley, Greensboro, N.C., for the Middle District of North Carolina; Charles R. Butler Jr., Mobile, Ala., for the Southern District of Alabama; and Lewis T. Babcok, Boulder, Colo., for the District of Colorado.

In addition, others approved were Robert Leon Jordon, Johnston City, Tenn., for the Eastern District of Tennessee; D. Brooks Smith, Altoona, Pa., for the Western District of Pennsylvania; and Jay C. Waldman, Philadelphia, for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

But 15 other judicial nominees have not yet had confirmation hearings before the committee, and their nominations will die when the Congress adjourns, which is likely to occur next week. --- EPA Decides Not To Decide For Now On Acid Rain Request

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Environmental Protection Agency says it has decided to postpone a decision on a petition asking it to determine that U.S. pollution forms acid rain hurting Canada.

The petition was filed in April by the six New England states, New York, New Jersey, Minnesota and four environmental groups. In addition, the Canadian province of Ontario filed a separate petition.

Don Clay, EPA’s acting assistant administrator for air pollution, on Friday wrote the states and environmental groups saying, ″It would be premature to rule on your petition at this time,″ the agency announced.

A similar letter was sent to Ontario.

The issue of sulfur dioxide emissions originating in the United States and forming acid rain that is killing aquatic life in lakes in sensitive watersheds of the Northeast, the Upper Midwest and in eastern Canada was first raised in the last days of the Carter administration in 1981.

During the Reagan administration the states, environmental groups and Canada revived the issue arguing that the United States has an obligation under the Clean Air Act for EPA to force states to rewrite their air pollution control plans to reduce the emissions harming Canada.

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