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What did you learn in school today son?

December 15, 2018

My son was enrolled in the Umpqua Community College wildlife biology class recently highlighted in the letters to the editor titled “Who Engineered this train wreck?”, from Nov.29, and “Alternative facts have no place in the newspaper,” from Dec 5. I am writing in response to Mr. Quinn’s rebuttal piece. For the record, Mr. Vaughn, the author of the first piece, did not commit a “lie of omission” as put forth by Mr. Quinn in his rebuttal.

How do I know this? It was not the professor (as stated by Mr. Quinn) who invited Mr. Vaughn to speak to the UCC wildlife biology class; it was, in fact, my son. I do not know what the professor’s relationship is to Umpqua Watersheds, but my son attended the class with the expectation of getting a wide spectrum of information on this very broad topic. What did my son learn in school? Logging is bad.

It was because of this extreme anti-logging messaging in the class that my son asked for and lobbied for Mr. Vaughn to speak to the class in order to provide an alternative viewpoint, since different viewpoints were clearly not part of the class curriculum.

As Mr. Vaughn stated in his piece, “Knowledge is powerful.” Our educators have a responsibility to share different viewpoints in their coursework in order for our children to develop critical thinking skills, so they can make their own decisions instead of having their decisions made for them. No educator or school should allow personal agendas to dominate their teaching. Only when all viewpoints are taught do we learn.

Christi Warren

Roseburg

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