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Namedropper 8/19/2018

August 19, 2018

Medical school founder a fellow

Robert W. Naismith, Ph.D., a founder of Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, has been elected a fellow of Queen Mary University of London.

Naismith was elected a fellow because of his years of service and commitment to the university as a trustee and as a member of the institution’s scientific advisory board. He accepted the honor in London on July 16 at a ceremony held during QMUL commencement exercises.

QMUL is a research-focused institution of higher education that is home to the William Harvey Research Institute, one of Europe’s largest pharmacological research institutes, as well as its largest heart center.

Naismith, because of his friendship with 1982 Nobel Prize in Medicine winners the late Sir John Vane of the William Harvey Institute and Bengt Samuelsson, professor and president of the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, served as a trustee of the William Harvey Institute, becoming a member of its scientific advisory board.

Vane and Samuelsson were awarded the noble prizefor their work on prostaglandins, which Naismith’s company, Biofor, used to investigate a Cox 2 inhibitor.

During his remarks in London, Naismith shared the story of the school of medicine’s founding with graduating students as a means of illustrating how a small but committed group of individuals can be the instruments of meaningful change, according to the school.

Super students

Misericordia University junior Sarah Sporko, a Carbondale native, spent her summer as a digital archives researcher at the Pennsylvania Anthracite Heritage Museum in McDade Park.

Recognized for her success in the classroom, Sporko’s summer work was part of Misericordia’s Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Program.

She helped the museum prepare for an upcoming photography exhibit and did research and wrote about the photos and photographers that will be on display this November.

“I come from a mining family… I am particularly excited to be able to work with the Anthracite Museum to help preserve this area’s mining history,” said Sporko.

The paid research fellowship, which ended this month, was under the direction of Jennifer Black, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of History at the university; and Bode Morin, the museum’s site administrator.

Sporko, a Holy Cross High School graduate, is a dual major in government, law and national security and history. Her majors give her a historical perspective on issues of government and law as she looks ahead to a career in public policy when she graduates in 2019, the university said.

She also participated in the New Leadership Pennsylvania Summer Institute in Pittsburgh in June. The weeklong leadership program sponsored by the Pennsylvania Center for Women and Politics is designed to encourage college-aged women to become politically active and take on leadership roles in politics and government ...

Local students who attended an awards dinner at King’s College for the National Spanish Examinations include: Samuel Goncalves and Ashley Frometa-Vasquez, West Scranton High School; Megan Dillon, Caroline Linn, Fatima Torres, Jake Mozeleski, Brenna Jordan, Maureen Nole, Charles Kulick and Camille Pastore, all Scranton Prep; and David Day, Dunmore High School. Scranton Prep’s Taylor Evans and Daniel Zych were also awarded. They were among around 1,100 local students from elementary through high school who competed in the examinations, sponsored by the Northeastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese.

Charles earned a $500 scholarship as the grand prize winner of the chapter’s annual essay contest. Brenna earned $100 scholarships as a runner-up.

Medical school founder a fellow

Robert W. Naismith, Ph.D., a founder of Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, has been elected a fellow of Queen Mary University of London.

Naismith was elected a fellow because of his years of service and commitment to the university as a trustee and as a member of the institution’s scientific advisory board. He accepted the honor in London on July 16 at a ceremony held during QMUL commencement exercises.

QMUL is a research-focused institution of higher education that is home to the William Harvey Research Institute, one of Europe’s largest pharmacological research institutes, as well as its largest heart center.

Naismith, because of his friendship with 1982 Nobel Prize in Medicine winners the late Sir John Vane of the William Harvey Institute and Bengt Samuelsson, professor and president of the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, served as a trustee of the William Harvey Institute, becoming a member of its scientific advisory board.

Vane and Samuelsson were awarded the Nobel prizefor their work on prostaglandins, which Naismith’s company, Biofor, used to investigate a Cox 2 inhibitor.

During his remarks in London, Naismith shared the story of the school of medicine’s founding with graduating students as a means of illustrating how a small but committed group of individuals can be the instruments of meaningful change, according to the school.

Super students

Misericordia University junior Sarah Sporko, a Carbondale native, spent her summer as a digital archives researcher at the Pennsylvania Anthracite Heritage Museum in McDade Park.

Recognized for her success in the classroom, Sporko’s summer work was part of Misericordia’s Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program.

She helped the museum prepare for an upcoming photography exhibit and did research and wrote about the photos and photographers that will be on display in November.

“I come from a mining family… I am particularly excited to be able to work with the Anthracite Museum to help preserve this area’s mining history,” said Sporko.

The paid research fellowship, which ended this month, was under the direction of Jennifer Black, Ph.D., assistant professor in the department of history at the university; and Bode Morin, the museum’s site administrator.

Sporko, a Holy Cross High School graduate, is a dual major in government, law and national security and history. Her majors give her a historical perspective on issues of government and law as she looks ahead to a career in public policy when she graduates in 2019, the university said.

She also participated in the New Leadership Pennsylvania Summer Institute in Pittsburgh in June. The weeklong leadership program sponsored by the Pennsylvania Center for Women and Politics is designed to encourage college-aged women to become politically active and take on leadership roles in politics and government ...

Local students who attended an awards dinner at King’s College for the National Spanish Examinations include Samuel Goncalves and Ashley Frometa-Vasquez, West Scranton High School; Megan Dillon, Caroline Linn, Fatima Torres, Jake Mozeleski, Brenna Jordan, Maureen Nole, Charles Kulick and Camille Pastore, all Scranton Prep; and David Day, Dunmore High School. Scranton Prep’s Taylor Ev ans and Daniel Zych were also awarded. They were among around 1,100 local students from elementary through high school who competed in the examinations, sponsored by the Northeastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese.

Char les earned a $500 scholarship as the grand prize winner of the chapter’s annual essay contest. Brenna earned a $100 scholarship as a runner-up.

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