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Today in Arizona History

July 17, 2019

PHOENIX (AP) — Sunday, July 21

On this date in 1901, Burton C. Mossman was named captain of the Arizona Rangers and authorized to raise a company of 10 or 12 men to hunt cattle rustlers and other criminals.

On this date in 1903, a severe rainstorm between the Dragoon Mountains and Tombstone washed out six El Paso and Southwestern Railroad bridges and flooded Fairbanks with 6 feet of water.

On this date in 1917, two ladies, traveling east from California, left Tucson in a rage after being ordered to remain in their hotel until they were ready to leave town. Their offense was wearing masculine attire, particularly “very tight fitting pants.” One lady said, “We’ve been to Phoenix and nobody said a word to us.”

On this date in 1931, the Arizona State Motor Vehicle Division authorized copper license plates for automobiles.

Monday, July 22

On this date in 1893, the city of Nogales was incorporated.

On this date in 1898, the Phoenix Daily Herald announced the marriage of Thomas Sorin, a prominent developer of Cochise County copper mines, to Sarah Herring, Arizona’s first woman attorney.

Tuesday, July 23

On this date in 1844, James “Uncle Jimmy” Pearce, discoverer of the Pearce copper mines in 1895, was born.

On this date in 1882, the Mormon settlement of Tempe was founded after it purchased 80 acres (323,749 sq. meters) of land for $3,000 from Charles T. Hayden, pioneer merchant, miller and ferryman.

On this date in 1909, armies of grasshoppers stripped the alfalfa fields of Mesa.

On this date in 1927, residents of Willcox, unhappy over the division of tax receipts, voted unanimously for separation from Cochise County.

On this date in 1931, a new $500,000 bridge was opened over the Salt River in Tempe on the anniversary of the settlement of the city by Charles T. Hayden.

Wednesday, July 24

On this date in 1890, a gasoline stove exploded in Yuma, setting off a fire which destroyed eight business buildings.

On this date in 1896, the city of Globe was extensively damaged by a flood. The Silver King Saloon, with its entire stock of liquor and cigars was wrecked by flood waters, as were many private homes. Mines in the area suffered flooded and caved-in tunnels, shop buildings were damaged and roads washed out.

On this date in 1917, a 22-year-old Douglas housewife was shipped back home by the Army when she was discovered aboard a U.S. troop transport ship with her husband.

Thursday, July 25

On this date in 1865, the first Masonic Lodge in Arizona held its first meeting in the upper room of the governor’s mansion in Prescott.

On this date in 1917, rancher Tom Price and his wife and two children were sleeping in their home near Mescal when water began pouring through the windows. The family barely had time to climb outside the bedroom window and up a mesquite tree when the house and all that was in it was completely washed away by a flood.

On this date in 1921, the first edition of Arizona Highways was published.

On this date in 1939, Tuzigoot was made a national monument by presidential proclamation.

Friday, July 26

On this date in 1844, Mariano Samaniego, a southern Arizona freighter, cattleman and operator of the stage line from Tucson to Oro Blanco who became a citizen of the United States under the terms of the Gadsden Purchase, was born.

On this date in 1917, five miles of Ajo Highway was reported washed out, with culvert pipe exposed across the road at intervals. Motorists were warned to use searchlights or risk crashing into the culverts. Sasco and Silverbell were cut off entirely as all roads and bridges leading into those towns were destroyed. Also on this date, a violent hailstorm filled the streets of Flagstaff with six inches of ice.

On this date in 1919, the city of Tucson gave 82 acres (331,842 sq. meters) of land on South Sixth Avenue to the War Department for use as an aviation field.

Saturday, July 27

On this date in 1862, General Order Number 12, issued by headquarters column from California, authorized the establishment of Camp Bowie at the Apache Pass Overland Mail Station.

On this date in 1864, John B. “Pie” Allen made the first application for homestead land in Arizona.

On this date in 2007, two news helicopters collided midair while covering a police chase in Phoenix, killing all four people on board.

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