AP NEWS

Taking Control of Osteoarthritis Knee Pain

December 18, 2018

(BPT) - For years, Susan struggled to use the stairs in her home, due to her osteoarthritis (OA) knee pain. The discomfort she felt when trying to walk up or down them was so unbearable that Susan and her husband were forced to sell their beloved home in order to find a ranch-style residence that would be more suitable for her knee pain. However, even with living in a single-story home, Susan still struggled to get through the day. Activities she used to take for granted – walking her dogs, cooking with her husband, and playing with her grandsons – simply became extremely painful.

“The pain was so severe that it forced me to change my everyday life. Suddenly, I needed my husband to help me walk through the grocery store, and I had a hard time sleeping through the night. While cooking dinner with my husband, I would have to take breaks. I had the knee pain, but it affected us both,” said Susan. “For us, selling our home was the last straw; I knew I needed to find a treatment for my OA knee pain. I couldn’t grin and bear it for another day.”

OA of the knee is a chronic and degenerative joint disease that affects millions of Americans.1,2 The prevalence is on the rise, but the average age of diagnosis is continuing to drop year after year, which means more Americans are living longer-term with debilitating OA pain when they don’t need to.3

Dr. Alexander Sah, an orthopedic surgeon and Medical Co-Director at the Institute for Joint Restoration in Fremont, California, continually seeks innovative treatment options that will offer relief for his patients living with OA knee pain. As a dedicated healthcare provider, Dr. Sah recommends ZILRETTA® (triamcinolone acetonide extended-release injectable suspension), the first and only FDA-approved treatment for OA knee pain that uses extended-release microsphere technology which slowly and continuously releases medicine in the knee joint. For Dr. Sah’s patients, and many others with OA knee pain, a single injection of ZILRETTA provided about 3 months of relief.

“For years, I’ve watched patient after patient come in complaining of OA knee pain desperate for help,” said Dr. Sah. “I’m thrilled to be able to offer my patients ZILRETTA to help fulfill this unmet need. With ZILRETTA, my patients have found effective knee pain relief, allowing them to continue living their lives and doing their daily activities with less knee pain.”

Over the years, Susan paid a lot of money, tried a lot of treatments, and took a lot of advice to relieve her pain. So when her doctor recommended ZILRETTA, a single injection non-opioid pain treatment, she was happy to try it. After receiving ZILRETTA in her knee, Susan noticed a significant change. Now that she has less knee pain, she enjoys taking walks with her four grandsons and trying new recipes in the kitchen with her husband, just a few of her favorite activities.

If you are suffering from OA knee pain, it’s time you said enough! Learn how you can give your knee the Z. Visit www.ZILRETTA.com and ask your doctor to learn more.

Indication and Important Risk Information

What is ZILRETTA?

ZILRETTA® (triamcinolone acetonide extended-release injectable suspension) is an extended-release corticosteroid approved to manage osteoarthritis knee pain. It is not intended for repeat use.

Who should not receive ZILRETTA?

You should not receive a ZILRETTA injection if you are allergic to corticosteroids, triamcinolone acetonide, or any other component of the product.

What possible side effects of corticosteroids could occur with ZILRETTA?

Rare serious allergic reactionsEffects in the injected knee such as infection (with pain, swelling and restricted motion) or joint damageIncreased chance of getting an infection, and a decreased ability to fight an infectionEffects on hormone production. These effects can be reversibleElevated blood pressure, sodium and water retention, and potassium lossIntestinal perforation if you have certain gastrointestinal disordersWeakening of bonesChanges in behavior or mood disturbancesIncreased pressure inside the eye

What are the most common side effects of receiving a ZILRETTA injection?

In multiple clinical trials, the most common side effects seen in people taking ZILRETTA were joint pain, headache, joint swelling, back pain, sore throat and runny nose, upper respiratory tract infection, and bruising.

What should you tell your doctor BEFORE receiving a ZILRETTA injection?

Tell your doctor about all of the medications you are taking (including both prescription and over-the-counter medicines) and about any medical conditions, especially if you have high blood pressure, heart disease, ulcers, diverticulitis or other gastrointestinal disorders, kidney problems, diabetes, glaucoma, behavior or mood disorders, and/or infections.

What should you tell your doctor AFTER receiving a ZILRETTA injection?

Contact your doctor if you develop a fever or other signs of infection, have an increase in pain along with swelling of the injected knee, restriction of joint motion, or a general feeling of discomfort. Contact your doctor immediately if you are exposed to chicken pox or measles, or for any new or worsening changes in behavior or mood.

These are not all of the possible side effects with ZILRETTA or corticosteroid medications. Please see the full Prescribing Information at www.ZILRETTALabel.com/PI.pdf. Always contact your doctor if you have questions or experience any side effects.

You are encouraged to report side effects to the FDA: Call 1-800-FDA-1088 (332-1088), or visit www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Flexion at 1-844-FLEXION (353-9466).

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1. Lozada, Carlos J. Osteoarthritis. 17 Sept. 2018, emedicine.medscape.com/article/330487-overview.

2. Arthritis By The Numbers. Arthritis Foundation, 27 Nov. 2017, www.arthritis.org/Documents/Sections/About-Arthritis/arthritis-facts-stats-figures.pdf.

3. Burbine, Sara A. Projecting the Future Public Health Impact of the Trend Toward Earlier Onset of Knee Osteoarthritis in the Past 20 Years. ACR/ARHP Scientific Meeting 2011, 8 Nov. 2011, acr.confex.com/acr/2011/webprogram/Paper22733.html.

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